Tuesday, August 28, 2018

Letter form the Cheder Board


Dear Friends,

Over the last week, we have seen an enormous effort being made by many parents to raise funds for our dear kinderlach. 700 people have already contributed! It is incredibly inspiring to see so many fathers and mothers and grandmothers and grandfathers focusing on helping make our school the best one it can be. Thank you, thank you, thank you!

We have also received many questions which we would like to respond to as best as we can: 

Why was this campaign so last minute?


In an ideal world we would have had more time to prepare and we would have scheduled the campaign at a more convenient time. We, the volunteer members of the Cheder board, have done an enormous amount of difficult fundraising. Besides the one million dollars for the Shnei Ohr campus, $500,000 was raised towards this past year's operating budget, and $250,000 was raised towards this upcoming year's operating budget now even before school started. These are historic figures even if they are not enough. We were hoping to raise a lot more but we simply could not do it in time. Our rebbies, morahs, and staff are currently two payrolls behind. We, the community, have a responsibility to them. Therefore, we had no choice but to turn to our parent body, who care for our children's chinuch more than anyone, to partner with us in this effort so we can start the year knowing that are staff will be paid on time for at least the first few months of the year. 

Why isn't the Cheder transparent? 

We are as transparent as we can be. There is nothing to hide. Our budget is $4,050,000, tuition brings in $2,800,000, we obtain $370,000 in government grants, rental income from camps brings in $40,000. 75% of families get a tuition scholarship. This leaves us with a deficit of $840,000 for the upcoming school year. The board is dedicated to raising a large portion of this but we simply cannot do it alone. We are happy to answer any questions about the school finances or anything else. Feel free to reach out.  

Why are so many families not paying full tuition but seem to be living a very comfortable lifestyle? 

We are extremely grateful to those who pay full tuition and to those who truly pay what they can even if it is not full tuition. The balance of being firm with tuition and being sensitive to those who are in need is a very delicate one. We try very hard to get as much tuition as we can in a manner that gives families the dignity that they deserve. As a community we must be there for every family - those who have more resources and those who have less. A core value for us is Ahavas Yisroel. At the end of the day it is up to each person to make paying their tuition obligation a priority in their life. We should hope that parents realize that nothing is more important than their children's education and tuition is not the area to cut corners. 

Why doesn't the board communicate more often?

We would love to and we should. We are simply overwhelmed with trying to function as executive director and a full development team on top of our core board responsibilities. We are all volunteers with full-time jobs or Shlichus of our own. In an effort to communicate directly with parents, we recently held a town-hall style meeting and if you weren't there you can still watch it at 
http://powerconsulting.co/cheder.html.  

What will happen if the campaign does not achieve its goal?

We are very optimistic that our parent body will make this happen for our children's future. But if chas v'shalom we don't then we cannot begin Cheder without securing the funding required to pay our dedicated rabbies, morahs, and staff for at least a few months ahead. It is simply not fair to them and not fair to our dear children who deserve teachers who are not working under extreme financial stress. 

Why should I support a school when I have had so many bad experiences in the past? 

We are well aware that people have had negative experiences with the school over the years. We feel your pain. We really do. Some of us on the board have also experienced sub-par chinuch experiences and/or sub-par experiences relating to tuition and administration with this mosad in the past. But in order to transform the school into one that will be excellent, we need to look forward and not backward. Punishing the school now, at such an exciting time of growth, will only hurt our children. Please see the many improvements that are being implemented for this upcoming school year here. These updates cost a lot of money. We need your partnership to pay for them. 

Why are we working on an 18 million dollar campus when we can't pay the teachers now?

It does seem contradictory. But if we only remain focused on the trees and never focus on the forest we will never get the resources that our children need so badly. So while it is difficult to work on a long-term campus when we are late on payroll now, we still must. Otherwise, our children will never have a facility where they can truly thrive. Additionally, a percentage of all Shnei Ohr income goes towards Cheder's current operational costs.

What, yet another matching campaign? 

Yes and no. Yes, it is a matching campaign and no it is not like the previous ones. This campaign has some very unique components to it. For years the community had asked the board to raise money from outside the Monsey Chabad community and we are very proud that $200,000 of our matching funds are from outside the Monsey Chabad community. Most of these matchers are giving only if they see our community coming together to give the rest. If we don't care about our own school why should they? We also understand that many parents are weighed down by their tuition obligations. Remember, 75% of our parents receive a tuition scholarship. So we found a platform that will allow for each family to raise from others - family, friends, and business associates. Reasonable goals were created for each family. If you believe your family's goal should be raised or lowered, please let us know and we will work with you. 

Why is the board spending so much money if it wasn't yet secured? 

We believe that we must put into place the highly capable leaders and systems that will allow for our children to have the best chinuch possible. Our approach is that instead of having 100 problems associated with ineffectiveness we will invest in making things effective and have one problem of raising money. We believe that people will invest in success. We sincerely hope that you will recognize this and invest with us and receive the best return possible - Chassidishe children with exemplary midos who love Torah and Yiddishkeit. 

Why is this my problem?

As the saying goes, "It takes a village." We are one community and we all have the same goals. When we all work together we will succeed. We all share equal responsibility to ensure that this mosad becomes the best it can be. Everyone can contribute - some can donate funds, some can get others to donate funds, some can give time, some can help organize events, and everyone can be positive and encouraging. Every man and woman can make a difference! 

Friends, the bottom line is that we have an extremely powerful potion being mixed together here. We have hundreds of tinokos shel beis raban about to come to school and connect to Hashem in the most powerful way possible - by immersing themselves in His holy Torah. The entire world, frum and not-yet-frum, are searching for what we have - Chassidus Chabad. When they taste it they can't get enough of it. We have it! We have amazing leaders in the form of our Rabbi Kaplan, Mrs. Rosenbluh, Mrs. Light, and their rebbies, morohs, and teachers. We have so many exciting major and minor improvements being made for this year. The Yetzer Hara sees this and is going to work overtime to prevent this. He will give you every excuse in the book why it is the board's fault, the menahel's fault, the rebbies' fault, the parents fault, etc. He will encourage you to post your negative thoughts on WhatsApp to discourage others. 

Friends, let's be honest. It is all excuses. It is nonsense. It is the Yetzer Hara.

A few dollars should not stand in the way of our children's future. We can make this happen! 

Let us be optimistic about the future. Let us all encourage each other. Let us only share positive messages. 

Before deciding not to help with the campaign, before posting a negative message about the Cheder - please take a moment and picture the adorable pure Mendels, Mushkas, Levis, and Nechama Dinas and ask yourself - will my decision help them or the opposite? 

Let us focus on creating the best Cheder that Lubavitch has to offer. Let Cheder Chabad of Monsey be a shining light to Monsey and the entire world of what Chabad chinuch really is. Let us give our children what they deserve. The time is now. 

https://www.duvys.com/match/saveourcheder

With deep humility and lots of love, 

Yona Abenson, Co-President
Avi Weinstein, Co-President
Dov Drizin, Vice President
Tzili Ehrenreich, Treasurer
Yossi Hirsch, Secretary
Beryl Frankel
Avraham Hayman
Yossi Light
Yossi Solomon
Board of Directors

Friday, August 24, 2018

Messing Bris Monday Morning

Danny Messing will iy"h be making a bris for "Baby A" Monday morning 16 Elul/Aug.27 at Tzemach Tzedek. Schachris will be at 9:30am, with the bris following at 10:30am.

Mazel Tov

Parsha Perspective

By Rabbi Yisroel Shusterman

This week’s Parsha Perspective is dedicated in memory of Elka bas Zisel OBM
         
Dedicated in memory of Leah bas Rochel OBM

We are currently in the Hebrew month of Elul, just a few weeks away from Rosh Hashanah and the High Holidays – a time of reflection, introspection and taking on new resolutions with which to enhance our lives, spiritually and meaningfully.

Cheder Chabad of Monsey hopes that these weekly Torah thoughts will help inspire to achieve those goals. All the students, staff and administration of Cheder Chabad of Monsey wish you and yours a happy, healthy and prosperous New Year. May this year be the year of the full and complete redemption with the coming of our righteous Moshiach - NOW!

Our Enemies, Our Selves

"When you go out to war on your enemies and G-d will place him in your hands..." No, that's not a typo. The sentence you just read is a direct translation ofDeuteronomy 21:10, the opening verse of this week's Torahreading of Ki Teitzei(Devorim [Deuteronomy]21:10-25:19).

The wording of the Written Torah is extremely precise. When a grammatical anomaly appears--such as the plural "enemies" who turns mid-sentence into a singular "him"- the Midrashim and commentaries will immediately step in to unearth the story behind the story and reveal the hidden lesson.

The Egyptians, the Amalekites, the Babylonians, the Romans, the Church, the Almohades, the Nazis, the Soviets...and now, the militant Islamists, who just want us dead;  we've had no shortage of enemies in our 4,000-year history. Generally speaking, they can be divided into two groups: spiritual enemies and physical enemies.

Yet these two enemies of Israelare intrinsically one. Time and again, Jewish history tells the story of how the weakening of our spiritual identity invariably leads to physical decline. An enemy of the Jewish soul is an enemy of the Jewish body, just as an enemy of the Jewish body is obviously an enemy of the Jewish soul.

This is the lesson implicit in the opening verse of our parshah: Our first line of defense in the war for Jewish survival is the realization that our plural "enemies" are, in truth, a singular "him." That the physical and spiritual fate of our people are inexorably intertwined. We must regard each physical attack against a Jew as an attack against the eternal spirit of Israel, and treat every spiritual danger as a threat to our physical survival.

What must we do to win the war? How is the battle to be waged so that "G-d will place him in your hands"? The answer lies enfolded in another grammatical curio in Ki Teitzei's opening verse:

"When you go to war on your enemies..."

We focus now on the word "on" in this line -- al in the Hebrew. The Hebrew word al, like its English equivalent, can mean, in this context, "against." In the simple meaning of the verse, going to war "on your enemies" means going to war against your enemies. But the word can also be understood in the sense of "above": don't go to war against them, go to war above them.

We have seen this so often in our experience as a people that we really shouldn't need a grammatical twist of a Torah verse to inform us of it. When we went to war above our enemies, confident of our moral and spiritual superiority and unapologetic of the righteousness of our cause, we always triumphed in the end, no matter how outnumbered we might have been in quantity of men and arms. But when we begin to doubt our own goodness, when we begin to regard decadent murderers as our moral equals, we are doomed to lose ground, even when, on the physical plane, we hold the military and strategic advantage.

A lesson as simple as it is profound: When you go out to war on your enemies, G-d will place him in your hands.

(From Chabad.org - Rabbi Yanki Tauber)

Thursday, August 23, 2018

Messing שלום זכר Friday Night

Danny Messing invites one and all to the שלום זכר in honor of the birth of his twin sons at the home of his parents, Mr. & Mrs. Tzadok L. Messing, 3 Mariner Way, Monsey.

 Mazel Tov

schedule for שבת פרשת כי-תצא 5778


Tuesday, August 21, 2018

Goldin Bris Tomorrow morning

With gratitude to the Almighty, I join my daughter and son in law in l informing you that the bris of our dear first grandson, will G-d willing take place tomorrow, Wednesday, 11 Elul at Mesivta Lev Tmimim Lubavitch, 7 North Rigaud Rd, Spring Valley, NY 10977. Shachris at 9am. Bris at 10am. Rabbi Gil Hami

Monday, August 20, 2018

Mazel Tov Messings!

Mazel Tov to Danny & Mushky Messing on the birth of twin boys! Mazel Tov to the zeide and bubbe Mr. & Mrs. Tzadok L and Gwen Messing

Friday, August 17, 2018

Mazel Tov Goldins!

Mazel Tov to Moshe & Chaya Mushka Goldin on the birth of a baby boy! Mazel tov to the zeide and bubbe Rabbi Gil & Devorah Hami and family

Parsha Perspective


By Rabbi Yisroel Shusterman
                    
This week’s Parsha Perspective is dedicated in memory of Elka bas Zisel OBM

Dedicated in memory of Leah bas Rochel OBM

Dear friend,

We are currently in the Hebrew month of Elul, just a few weeks away from Rosh Hashanah and the High Holidays – a time of reflection, introspection and taking on new resolutions with which to enhance our lives, spiritually and meaningfully. 

Cheder Chabad of Monsey hopes that these weekly Torah thoughts will help inspire to achieve those goals. All the students, staff and administration of Cheder Chabad of Monsey wish you and yours a happy, healthy and prosperous New Year. May this year be the year of the full and complete redemption with the coming of our righteous Moshiach - NOW! 

This week’s Torah portion, Shoftim (Devorim [Deuteronomy] 16:18-21:9), is always read on the first Shabbat of the month of Elul. As nothing is accidental, this Torah portion must contain important lessons for us to implement during this auspicious month.

Shoftim means “judges.” The Torah commands us to appoint a hierarchy of righteous judges in every city and province. On a literal level, this commandment refers to judges who adjudicate civil, criminal and religious issues. On a deeper level, however, this commandment, as well as its details, has great meaning for every one of us in our personal lives. Let us examine one of this law’s details:

“You shall not pervert justice; you shall not show favoritism, and you shall not take a bribe.” (Devorim [Deuteronomy] 16:19)

A person is “bribed” by a sense of self-love, and is incapable of rendering a completely fair self-evaluation. Once the Torah prohibits the perversion of justice, is it necessary to ban bribery? Can there be a greater miscarriage of justice than bribery?

Rashi, the preeminent 11th century Bible commentator, explains that the Torah forbids bribery even in an instance where the giver stipulates that the money is being given on condition that the judge issues a fair verdict! For as soon as the judge is thus “bribed,” he will be biased in favor of that particular party, and will be unable to issue an objective ruling. 
As the verse continues: “for bribery blinds the eyes of the wise.” As soon as a kinship exists between a judge and one of the litigants, that judge is unfit to preside over that case.

During the month of Elul, every person is expected to judge his or her actions and accomplishments of the previous year. However, every person is “bribed” by a sense of self-love, and is incapable of rendering a completely fair evaluation. Therefore, every person must appoint a “judge,” an impartial spiritual mentor who can issue an objective opinion.
Furthermore, the very knowledge that at the end of every week or month one will have to discuss one’s spiritual accomplishments with another is oftentimes enough to impel an individual onto the path of improvement. As RabbiYochanan ben Zakkai said to his disciples, “If only you would fear G‑d as much as you fear your fellow man.”

(Excerpts from Chabad.org - by Rabbi Naftali Silberberg)

May you have a meaningful and uplifting Shabbos!

If you would like to dedicate the weekly Parsha Perspective in honor or memory of a person or occasion, please contact Rabbi Shusterman at yshusterman@chedermonsey.org

schedule for Shabbos פרשת שופטים


Tuesday, August 14, 2018

Message from Rabbi Markowitz

ראש חודש אלול תשע"ח

In response to the question that many are asking, I’m happy to notify that B”H this year was a good crop for Yanaver Esrogim. As a result I will be able to continue to sell Esrogim for the community at the same prices that I have been selling for over thirty years Bli Ein Hora, and not for the high prices which Esrogim were being sold last year.

Wishing you all a כתיבה וחתימה טובה, שנה טובה ומתוקה!

Zalmen Leib Markowitz

Friday, August 10, 2018

Parsha Perspective

By Rabbi Yisroel Shusterman

This week’s Parsha Perspective is dedicated in memory of Elka bas Zisel OBM

Dedicated in memory of Leah bas Rochel OBM

Dear Friend,                                                                                                                                                                     
We are about to enter the Hebrew month of Elul, just a few weeks away from Rosh Hashanah and the High Holidays – a time of reflection, introspection and taking on new resolutions with which to enhance our lives, spiritually and meaningfully. 

Cheder Chabad of Monsey hopes that these weekly Torah thoughts will help inspire to achieve those goals. All the students, staff and administration of Cheder Chabad of Monsey wish you and yours a happy, healthy and prosperous New Year. May this year be the year of the full and complete redemption with the coming of our righteous Moshiach - NOW! 

Ever heard a little kid bargaining with G-d? "G-d, if I pass this test/get a Barbie doll/don't get into trouble, I'll brush my teeth every night/walk around the block sixteen times without stepping on a crack/hold my breath and count to 100..."

Ridiculous? Small-minded? Immature? Well, are our desires any more mature, our deals any more intelligent? So you promised to stay in shul for the entire service/read a Jewish book/say something nice to your mother-in-law. Are you any more likely to be guaranteed a positive answer to your hopes and aspirations?

There is one "bribe" however that G-d doesn't refuse: charity.

We'll read in the Torah this week, Re'eh  (Devorim  [Deuteronomy] 11:26-16:17), that we have the responsibility and privilege to support the poor. It is traditional to increase our charitable donations especially at this time of year (the month of Elul, which PG starts this week and which is the lead-in month before the High Holidays of Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur). However, isn't this just a particularly blatant attempt to bribe G-d?  Does it really work? Why tzedakah (charity) more than any other mitzvah?

A wealthy Jew had been a long time financial supporter of the famous Rebbe Zushe. He used to provide the Rebbe's household running expenses and was content to receive regular blessings and advice in return. Once he showed up in Annipoli, Reb Zushe's hometown, only to find Reb Zushe's wife home alone.

"Where is the Rebbe?"

"He's gone to visit his Rebbe."

"My Rebbe has a Rebbe?"

The rich man was no fool. "If my Rebbe has a Rebbe, why am I wasting time with the disciple? I've been doing so well by receiving the blessings of Reb Zushe, imagine the jackpot that awaits me were I to transfer my support to his Rebbe..."

He abandoned Reb Zushe and became a follower of Rabbi DovBer of Mezritch, Reb Zushe's Rebbe.

A few months later, after a series of calamitous business failures, he was back in Annipoli, totally bankrupt.

"I accept that my business failure is punishment for deserting you," he cried to Reb Zushe, "but why? What was wrong with my logic?"

"There was nothing wrong with your logic per se," Reb Zushe answered, "just in the application. Till now, when you gave tzedakah without assessing the worthiness of the recipient, G-d responded in kind, looking after you, irrespective of whether you truly deserved it. Once you started cost-benefit analyzing where you could get the best value for the money, G-d had a good look at how deserving you are, and you obviously came up short."

I submit that this is why it is traditional to increase in charitable giving at this time of the year and that is why we always read this parshah the week Elul begins. We're committing to change, to improve. We pray that G-d accepts us favorably, but who among us can be truly comfortable with the year that was? Ill decisions made, promises broken and wrong forks taken on the road of life. Our only hope is that G-d takes us back, warts and all, without examining too closely whether we deserve it. And, to set an example to G-d, we too hand out help with an open hand to all, (and perhaps a bit more than usual!) and with the hope that, please G-d, this year we will all receive the greatest gift of all: the final redemption, with our righteous Moshiach.

(Excerpts from Chabad.org - by Rabbi Elisha Greenbaum)

May you have a meaningful and uplifting Shabbos

If you would like to dedicate the weekly Parsha Perspective in honor or memory of a person or occasion, please contact Rabbi Shusterman at yshusterman@chedermonsey.org

Shabbos Parshas ראה תשע"ח schedule

































PLEASE NOTE: THERE WILL BE A KIDDUSH FOLLOWING DAVENING