Tuesday, November 29, 2016

Rosh Chodesh Kislev Farbrengen for Ladies


Rosh Chodesh Kislev Farbrengen

There will be a farbrengen in honor of ראש חודש כסלו on Wednesday night, November 30th, at Tzemach Tzedek shul, after the 8:30pm Maariv.

Hundreds Gather to Celebrate Cheder Chabad of Monsey's Children

Hundreds of parents and Anash gathered at Monsey’s Atrium Plaza Ballroom for Cheder Chabad of Monsey’s "Our Children’s Cheder Celebration".

The event’s honorees were outstanding medical professionals of the greater Monsey community, who are parents and friends of Cheder Chabad and have through their generosity, community service and personal example impacted Jewish life in the community: Menashe Friedman, EMT, Yechezkel Litzman, EMT-P, Avraham Polinger, MD, Yehudah Schild, MD, Zev Zelenko, MD, Chaya Jordan, MD, and Rashi Kaplan, RN. 

The evening began with a delicious buffet dinner and musical entertainment by the Pumpidisa Band. 

Following dinner, a video of the Rebbe speaking about Chinuch was shown. Rabbi Dov Drizin then opened up the program with passionate remarks on the importance of our children’s Chinuch and how we are all partners in ensuring its success. 

Based on a spontaneous matching grant offer made by Monsey philanthropist, Reb Avraham Hayman, in honor of his mother’s yahrzeit, לאה בת שרגא פייבעל, an on-the-spot fundraiser was held and raised more than $140,000 toward a capital campaign for a new state-of-the-art Cheder Chabad of Monsey Boys Division Campus!

Rabbi Boruch D. Lesches shared a Dvar Torah on behalf of his fellow Cheder Vaad HaChinuch members Rabbi Dr. Chaim D. Kagan and Rabbi Zalmen L. Markowitz. 

Rabbi Moshe Wiener, principal of the Cheder Boys Division, spoke on behalf of the Cheder Girls Division principal, Mrs. Chaya Rosenbluh, the Cheder Pre-School Division director, Mrs. Yona Lazarus, the Boys Division Secular Studies principal, Rabbi Avi Frank, and the Girls Secular Studies Principal, Mrs. Chana Phillip, about the amazing personal attention students are receiving throughout all divisions of the Cheder. 

This was followed by an adorable video of Cheder students speaking about how much Cheder Chabad of Monsey means to them. 

The evening concluded with a sumptuous viennese dessert reception. 

Photos by Nechemiah Kaplan

















Sunday, November 27, 2016

Davening Times for the week of Parshas Toldos for Tzemach Tzedek

Shacharis - Sunday                                                                    7:00, 8:00, 9:00am

Shacharis - Monday thru Wednesday, Friday                            6:45, 7:00, 8:00am

Shacharis - Thursday (Rosh Chodesh)                                               6:45, 8:00am

Mincha - Sunday thru Thursday                                                                 4:20pm

Maariv - Sunday, thru Thursday                                              5:05, 8:30, 9:30pm

Friday, November 25, 2016

Parshas Chayei Sara Schedule for Tzemach Tzedek

The following is the Tzemach Tzedek schedule for Shabbos Mevorchim Parshas Chayei Sara:

Friday - ערב ש"ק

Licht Bentchen                                                                                        4:12pm

Minchah Erev Shabbos                                                                           4:28pm

Kabbolas Shabbos                                                                                  5:00pm

No Kiddush between 5:43/6:00pm - 6:43/7:00pm

שבת קודש

Tehillim Shabbos Mevorchim                                                                   8:30am

Sof Zman Krias Shma                                                                            9:20am

Shacharis                                                                                             10:00am

Kiddush/Farbrengen following Davening

Minchah Gedolah                                                                                 12:07pm

Rov's Halochoh Shiur                                                                             3:45pm

Minchah                                                                                                  4:15pm

Motzoei Shabbos/Maariv                                                                        5:15pm  

Avos U'bonim                                                                                        6:45pm

א גוטען שבת

Parsha Perspective

By Rabbi Yisroel Shusterman

This week’s Parsha Perspective is dedicated by Mr. Binyomin Philipson in memory of his late mother Mrs. Ellen (Elka bas Zisel) Philipson OBM

In memory of Leah bas Rochel OBM

"G-d helps those who help themselves"

Is this statement heresy? Does it deny the hand of G-d in our successes?

But indeed, "G-d helps those who help themselves" is a perfectly religious statement. What it means is absolutely consistent with traditional Jewish thinking. G-d does indeed help us to accomplish things, but He requires us to help ourselves first. If we just sit back and wait for miracles to happen, we may be disappointed.

"G-d will bless you in all that you do," (Deuteronomy 15, 18) makes it very clear. Our blessings come from G-d, but we must do. Of course, we believe in miracles - but we mustn't rely on them. The combination of our own hard work and efforts coupled with G-d's blessing is the ideal road to success. This is the meaning of the concept “Hishtadlut” - attempt and involvement.

The classic analogy is the farmer. He can plough and plant, sow and shvitz from today until tomorrow but if the rains don't come nothing will grow. Conversely, all the rains in the world will not cause anything to grow if the farmer hasn't planted first. After the farmer has done his work and the rains come from above, there will be a plentiful crop. And it's the same story whether we are farmers or shopkeepers, professionals or artisans, employers or employees.

This week's Parshah Chaye Sarah (Bereishis [Genesis] 23:1-25:18) tells of Isaac taking Rebecca as his wife. "And Isaac brought her to the tent of Sarah his mother." Rashi, quoting the Midrash, explains this to mean more than the obvious. When she entered the tent, it was as if she was Sarah, Isaac's mother. Because Sarah was of such saintly character, she was granted three special miracles. Her Shabbat candles burned the entire week, her dough was particularly blessed, and a heavenly cloud attached itself to her tent. When Sarah died, these blessings disappeared. When Rebecca arrived on the scene, they resumed immediately. In fact, this was a clear sign to Isaac that Rebecca was indeed his soul mate and that the shidduch was made in Heaven.

Each of those three miracles, however, required some form of human input first. A candle and fire had to be found, the dough had to be prepared and a tent had to be pitched before G-d would intervene and make those miracles happen. In other words, He does help us but we must help ourselves first.

Perhaps  like the fellow who would make a fervent prayer to G-d every week that he win the lottery, but no luck. In anguished disappointment, he vented his frustration with the Almighty. "Oh, G-d!  For months I've been praying to you. Why haven't you helped me win the lottery?" Whereupon a heavenly voice was heard saying, "Because you haven't bought a ticket, dummy!"

I wish it were that simple to win lotteries. But the fact is that it is the same in all our endeavors. G-d helps those who help themselves. May we all do our part.  Please G-d, He will do His. 

(Excerpts from Chabad.org - from  Rabbi  Yossy Goldman)

May you have a meaningful and uplifting Shabbos!!

Tuesday, November 22, 2016

Save The Date - MBCM Gala Banquet

Monsey Beis Chaya Mushka is celebrating its 11th year!

Save The Date  Join together for our annual Gala Banquet:

January 22nd 2017 – 24 Teves 5777.

Monday, November 21, 2016

Shulchan Aruch in English

A brand new Shulchan Aruch in English on Hilchos Shabbos is available by Rabbi Yossi Touger for $35 - in Tzemach Tzedek in the morning, or via rabbitouger@monseybcm.com or 845 430 8342


Monsey Chanukah Parade


Chof Mar-Cheshvan Farbrengen

There will be a farbrengen in honor of כ' מר-חשון tonight, November 21st, at Tzemach Tzedek shul, after the 8:30pm Maariv.

Sunday, November 20, 2016

Davening Times for the week of Chayei Sara for Tzemach Tzedek

Shacharis - Sunday                                                                    7:00, 8:00, 9:00am

Shacharis - Monday thru Friday                                             6:45, 7:00, 8:00am

Mincha - Sunday thru Thursday                                                                 4:20pm

Maariv - Sunday, thru Thursday                                              5:10, 8:30, 9:30pm

Friday, November 18, 2016

Schaeffer L'chaim

Mazel tov to Leib Schaeffer and to Chaya Schaeffer and family on the engagement of their daughter Mushka to Mendy Parnas of Crown Heights.

The L'chaim will take place אי"ה on Sunday, November 20th, at 8 p.m. at Lubavitch Yeshiva, 570 Crown Street.

Mazel Tov Abramowitzs!

Mazal Tov to Yitzchok and Yehudis Abramowitz on the birth of a grandson to Rabbi Moshe and Naomi Chaya Naiditch of Yerushalayim!

New Season of Avos U'Bonim Kicks Off at Tzemach Tzedek

The new winter season of Avos U'bonim kicked off this past Motzoei Shabbos Parshas Lech-Lecha at the Tzemach Tzedek Shul in Monsey.

Over 60 boys with their fathers participated in a beautiful program of learning, Psukim, raffles and a Chassidishe Ma'seh! Yasher Ko’ach to Rabbi N. Bronstein and family for sponsoring the refreshments after the learning. 

"It was a beautiful sight to behold", commented many of the fathers. "It is indeed true Yiddish nachas to see so many kinderlach and their fathers learning together”

Boys from all over Monsey, Spring Valley and other suburbs including students of the Cheder from Westchester, NY participated that evening. 

We hope to see everyone back again for all the forthcoming Avos U'bonim programs. 

Anybody who wants to sponsor an evening of such Nachas should please contact Rabbi Shusterman at 917-282-3505

















Parshas Vayera Schedule for Tzemach Tzedek

The following is the Tzemach Tzedek schedule for Shabbos Parshas Vayera:

Friday - ערב ש"ק

Licht Bentchen                                                                                        4:16pm

Minchah Erev Shabbos                                                                           4:32pm

Kabbolas Shabbos                                                                                  5:05pm

No Kiddush between 5:41/6:00pm - 6:41/7:00pm

שבת קודש

Rov's Chassidus Shiur                                                                           8:45am

Sof Zman Krias Shma                                                                            9:15am

Shacharis                                                                                               9:30am

Rov's Halochoh Shiur                                                                             3:45pm

Minchah                                                                                                  4:15pm

Motzoei Shabbos/Maariv                                                                        5:18pm  

Avos U'bonim                                                                                        6:45pm

א גוטען שבת

Parsha Perspective

By Rabbi Yisroel Shusterman

This week’s Parsha Perspective is dedicated by Mr. Binyomin Philipson in memory of his late mother Mrs. Ellen (Elka bas Zisel) Philipson OBM

In memory of Leah bas Rochel OBM


In our Torah portion this week Vayeira (Bereishis [Genesis] 18:1-22:24) it says: And G-d said: "...Abraham shall be a great people... Because I know him, that he will command his children and his household after him that they shall keep the way of G-d, to do Tzedoka and justice" (Genesis 18:17-19)

Jews don't believe in charity.

Instead of charity, the Jew gives tzedakah, which means "righteousness" and "justice." When the Jew contributes his money, time and resources to the needy, he is not being benevolent, generous or "charitable." He is doing what is right and just.

The story is told of a wealthy chassid who once received a letter from his Rebbe, Rabbi Abraham Yehoshua Heshel of Apt, requesting him to give 200 rubles to save a fellow chassid from financial ruin. The wealthy chassid regularly contributed to his Rebbe's charitable activities, but this particular letter arrived at a financially inconvenient time and contained a request for an exceptionally large sum; after some deliberation, the chassid decided not to respond to the Rebbe's request.

Shortly thereafter, the chassid's fortunes began to fall. One business venture failed badly, and then another; before long he had lost everything.

"Rebbe," he cried, when he had gained admittance to Rabbi Abraham Yehoshua's room, "I know why this has happened to me. But was my sin so terrible to deserve so severe a punishment? And is it right to punish without warning? If you would have told me how important it was to give those 200 rubles, I would have carried out your instructions to the letter!"

"But you haven't been punished in any way," replied the Rebbe.

"What do you mean? All my wealth has been taken from me!"

"Nothing that was yours was taken from you," said the Rebbe. "You see, when my soul came down to earth, a certain amount of material resources were allotted to me for use in my work. However, my days and nights are taken up with prayer, the study and teaching of Torah, and counseling those who come to me for guidance; leaving no time for the task of managing all that money. So these resources were placed in the trust of a number of "bankers" - people who would recognize their duty to support my work. When you failed to carry out your role, my account with you was transferred to another banker."

The Jew believes that material wealth is not a crime, but a blessing from G-d. One who has so been blessed should regard himself as G-d's "banker" - one who is privileged to have been entrusted by the Creator with the role of dispensing the resources of His creation to others.

G-d could have allotted equal portions of His world to all its inhabitants. But then the world would have been nothing more than a showpiece of G-d's creative powers, predictable as a computer game and static as a museum display. G-d wanted a dynamic world - a world in which man, too, is a creator and provider. A world in which the controls have, to a certain extent, been handed over to beings who have the power to choose between fulfilling or reneging on their role.

Thus Jewish law requires every individual to give tzedakah, even one who is himself sustained by the tzedakah of others. If the purpose of tzedakah were merely to rectify the unequal distribution of wealth between rich and poor, this law would make no sense. Tzedakah, however, is much more than that: it is the opportunity granted to every person to become a "partner with G-d in creation."

Giving tzedakah is, above all, a humbling experience. Before us stands a human being less fortunate than ourselves. We know that G-d could have just as easily provided him with everything he requires, instead of sending him to us for his needs. Here is a person who is suffering poverty in order to provide us with the opportunity to do a G-dly deed!

By the same token, if divine individual providence places us on the receiving end of a charitable act, we need not be demoralized by the experience. For we know that G-d could have just as easily provided us with all that we need Himself, and that our need for human aid is merely in order to grant another person the ability to do a G-dly deed. Our "benefactor" is giving us money or some other resource; we are giving him something far greater - the opportunity to become a partner with G-d in creation.

In the words of our sages: "More than the rich man does for the pauper, the pauper does for the rich man."

(from chabad.org - Rabbi  Yanki Tauber)

May you have a meaningful and uplifting Shabbos!!

Sunday, November 13, 2016

Davening Times for the week of Vayera for Tzemach Tzedek

Shacharis - Sunday.                                                                   7:00, 8:00, 9:00am

Shacharis - Monday thru Friday                                             6:45, 7:00, 8:00am

Mincha - Sunday thru Thursday                                                              4:25pm

Maariv - Sunday, thru Thursday                                            5:15, 8:30, 9:30pm

Friday, November 11, 2016

Parsha Perspective

By Rabbi Yisroel Shusterman

This week’s Parsha Perspective is dedicated by Mr. Binyomin Philipson in memory of his late mother Mrs. Ellen (Elka bas Zisel) Philipson OBM

Note: The last twenty verses of this week’s Torah portion (Bereishis [Genesis]12:1-17:27) discuss  the commandment of  brit milah (circumcision) to our forefather Abraham. The following article is based on an address that the Rebbe delivered in 1942 – as the Holocaust fire raged in Europe in all its ferocity – at a small brit ceremony in New York City. Starting in 1995, parts of the Rebbe's personal notes ("Reshimot") were published, and in it were also the shorthand notes he had written for that enlightening talk.

A Brit, like much of our history as a people, is painful, but we celebrate it nonetheless.

The first of the 613 mitzvot given to a Jew was the mitzvah of a brit. Though Abraham voluntarily observed all the (other) mitzvot of the Torah, the first mitzvah that he was actually commanded to observe was that of circumcision.

Perhaps this can be attributed to the fact that circumcision embodies some of the fundamentals of Jewish life and practice. In fact, the Talmud asserts that it is equal to all the other mitzvot of the Torah, combined

The brit is the only mitzvah whose effect can actually be seen. While every mitzvah is a transforming experience, the brit is the only one that actually leaves a lasting and permanent impression on the person. While we believe in the eternal transformative effect of every mitzvah fulfilled – in truth, every mitzvah becomes a part of our deeper consciousness and remains an indistinguishable part of who we are – but this is the only one whose effect can actually be seen.

A recent U.N. report attributed to circumcision numerous health benefits. Many doctors actually suggest circumcision for those reasons as well as for other reasons. But is that why we do it?

Definitely not. We do it because it is a mitzvah. Because G‑d commanded us to do so.

In truth, every mitzvah has its physical and material benefits - though that's not our reason for doing so. The brit reminds us that whether it's Shabbat or tefillin, Family Purity, charity or kosher: the benefits, real and tangible, are there - even if they don't constitute the reason why we observe them.

The baby cries, he doesn't understand; there's pain and hurt. And appreciation for all the symbolism, tradition and meaning are still many years away. An older person would perhaps bite his lip, knowing that the divine energy overshadows the momentary pain. But right now little guy doesn't feel that way.

How often do we feel that the sacrifices required for the observance of a particular mitzvah make the ritual more of a nuisance than a spiritual experience?

Invariably, however, we later do come to appreciate the magnitude of what we've done.

We Celebrate! The cries of Mazal Tov! pierce the air as the crying subsides The Talmud says that circumcision is one of the mitzvot that our nation has always accepted with simchah (joy), even under the harshest of conditions and the threat of execution, through the ages, through the Holocaust, and until this very day.

Because the "Oy" of being Jewish, is far outweighed by the "Joy" of being G‑d's chosen nation.

(Excerpts from Chabad.org -By Rabbi Asher Deren)

Sunday, November 6, 2016

Davening Times for the week of Parshas Lech Lecha for Tzemach Tzedek

Shacharis - Sunday                                                                    7:00, 8:00, 9:00am

Shacharis - Monday thru Friday                                              6:50, 7:00, 8:00am

Mincha - Sunday thru Thursday                                                               4:30pm

Maariv - Sunday thru Thursday                                             5:20, 8:30, 9:30pm

Friday, November 4, 2016

Parshas Noach Schedule for Tzemach Tzedek

The following is the Tzemach Tzedek schedule for Shabbos Parshas Noach:

Friday - ערב ש"ק

Licht Bentchen                                                                                        5:29pm

Minchah Erev Shabbos                                                                           5:44pm

Kabbolas Shabbos                                                                                  6:15pm


No Kiddush between 6:40/7:00pm - 7:40/8:00pm

שבת קודש

Rov's Chassidus Shiur                                                                           9:00am

Sof Zman Krias Shma                                                                           10:06am

Shacharis                                                                                              10:00am

Rov's Halochoh Shiur                                                                             4:45pm

Minchah                                                                                                  5:30pm

Motzoei Shabbos/Maariv                                                                        6:30pm  

א גוטען שבת

On Motzoei Shabbos set clocks back one hour to EST

Parsha Perspective

By Rabbi Yisroel Shusterman

This week’s Parsha Perspective is dedicated by Mr. Binyomin Philipson in memory of his late mother Mrs. Ellen (Elka bas Zisel) Philipson OBM

Often times, we feel as if life is one extended hurricane. We are constantly battling the waves which the sea of life sends our way.  One wave after another threatens to capsize us and we need to skillfully navigate our way over its raging crest. Indeed, the daily financial pressures and business worries which life presents us with are dubbed by King Solomon as the "mighty waters" which threaten to drown us. They primarily imperil our spiritual side, desensitizing us to that which is really important in life through causing us to be constantly focused on making another buck. They constantly occupy our minds, rendering it like a vessel filled to the brim with murky waters which won't allow the radiance of the sun to let it sparkle.

Our Torah portion this week Noach (Bereishis [Genesis] 6:9 -11:32) speaks of the great Flood that washed away all of civilization. Only Noah and his family survived the Flood by entering the Ark which protected them from the pelting rain from above and the churning waters which rose from the depths.

Our eternal Torah isn't merely telling us a fascinating tale. If we look a bit deeper, at the story behind the story, we can also unravel the secret behind surviving all floods - even the ones which the meteorologists don't forecast: the ominous floods of life.

G-d commanded Noah to enter an Ark. The Chassidic master, Baal Shem Tov, points out that the Hebrew word for "ark," teivah, also means "word." We all can survive the floods, which wish to engulf our lives, through engrossing ourselves in the holy "words" of Torah and prayer. The person who wakes up in the morning and devotes his first hours to earnest prayer and some short words of Torah study, before running off to work, effectively insulates himself against life's storms. Starting the day with prayer and Torah serves as our daily reminder that G-d is in control, and though we must strive to earn a livelihood, we must never let ourselves become overly perturbed by business pressures - because ultimately everything is from G-d, and G-d is always good.

One who meets life's storms while in the safe sanctuary of the "Ark" will find that the storm waters which seem to be so destructive are actually purifying waters. G-d purified the world through the flood (which lasted forty days, similar to a mikvah [ritual pool] which must contain forty sa’ah [a Biblical liquid measure] of rain water), and He purifies us by sending challenges in our direction. If we are properly prepared for these storms, they bring out our highest and most noble qualities, elevating us to spiritual heights we could never attain without the help of these hurricanes.

(Excerpts from Chabad.org - from Rabbi Naftali Silberberg)

May you have a meaningful and uplifting Shabbos!!