Monday, November 30, 2015

Yud Tes Kislev Farbrengen at Tzemach Tzedek

Please join us for a Grand Farbrengen on 

Tuesday Evening, December 1, 19 Kislev – יום ג' בערב י"ט כסלו

With special guest

Rabbi Shmuel Rodal שי'

The Rebbe’s Shliach to Milan, Italy

Maariv at 8:30, Farbrengen to follow

Men and Women are encouraged to attend!

Good Yom Tov!

לשנה טובה בלימוד החסידות ובדרכי החסידות תכתבו ותחתמו

Yud Tes Kislev with Rabbi YY Jacobson in Monsey

In honor of י"ט כסלו, Ohr Chaim of Monsey invites you to an inspiring Musical Kumzitz Fabrengen 

With Rabbi YY Jacobson

Yoely Lebovits & Ohr Choizer Band

Tuesday Evening, December 1, 19 Kislev, 8:30 PM EST, at the Pupa Hall, 15 Widman Ct, Spring Valley, NY.

For men, woman and children.

Free admission. Refreshments will be served.

Sunday, November 29, 2015

Women's Chanukah Event


Rabbi Aron Dovid Gancz Sitting Shiva

Boruch Dayan HaEmes - We are deeply saddened to inform you of the passing of Rabbi Aron Dovid Gancz's father.

Shiva will be observed at the Gancz residence, 24 Laura Drive, Airmont NY 10901, tonight, Sunday, 11.29.2015 from 5:00 pm - 10:00 pm

המקום ינחם אתכם בתוך שאר אבלי ציון וירושלים

Davening Times for the week of Parshas Vayeishev for Tzemach Tzedek

Shacharis - Sunday                                                                                 8:00, 9:00am

Shacharis - Monday thru Friday                                                               7:00, 8:00am

Mincha - Sunday thru Thursday                                                                        4:15pm

Maariv - Sunday thru Thursday                                                       5:05, 8:30, 9:30pm

Thursday, November 26, 2015

Parsha Perspective

By Rabbi Yisroel Shusterman

This week’s Parsha Perspective is dedicated by Mr. Binyomin Philipson
in memory of his late mother Mrs. Ellen (Elka bas Zisel) Philipson OBM

There is a fascinating Midrashic interpretation in this week’s Torah portion Vayishlach (Bereishis 32:4-36:43), about the dramatic encounter between Jacob and Esau. The Torah says, "And Esau ran towards him (Jacob) and embraced him… and he kissed him." The Hebrew word for "and he kissed him" is vayishakayhu. In the Torah, this word is written with a line of dots above it. Says the Midrash Yalkut Shimoni: These dots are there to indicate that the word can be read differently; not vayishakayhu, he kissed him, but rather vayishachayhu, he bit him!

How can we understand this Midrash which seems to change the entire meaning of the word? A kiss is an expression of love and a bite is the opposite! Says the Sfat Emet (Rabbi Yehudah Leib Alter, 1847-1905, the second Rebbe of the Chassidic dynasty of Ger), "When Esau kisses (materialism), Jacob is bitten (spirituality)!"

What does this mean and how does this play out in our lives today? This explanation of this Midrash actually reflects an approach and insight to a fundamental issue which can confront a Jew today. Which is the greater test of faith, affluence or poverty? Is it harder to be a good Jew when you're rich or when you're poor, when you're successful or when you're struggling? No doubt, we would all much rather accept upon ourselves the test of affluence, wouldn't we? But let's not be subjective about it. Let us rather take an objective approach historically.

This forthcoming week, Tuesday, is the 19th of Kislev (Dec 1), on the Jewish calendar. In 1798, on the 19th day of Kislev, Rabbi Schneur Zalman of Liadi, founder of Chabad Chassidism, was miraculously released from incarceration in S. Petersburg, on trumped up charges of anti-government activity.

There is a story about Rabbi Schneur Zalman, which happened immediately after this miraculous event. Back in the early 19th century, Napoleon was conquering Europe and promising liberty and equality for all. When he squared up against Russia, many Jewish leaders sided with him, hoping he would finally bring an end to Czarist persecution and enable Russian Jewry to enjoy full civil rights. Rabbi Schneur Zalman of Liadi, founder of Chabad, thought differently. He actively opposed Napoleon and even had his Chassidim assist in intelligence gathering for the Russian army.

When his colleagues challenged him and questioned his apparent lack of concern for the well-being of his own people, he argued that while Napoleon might be good for the Jews economically, his victory would result in spiritual disaster. History proved him correct. Without the Little Emperor, Russian Jews remained staunchly Jewish, while French Jewry virtually vanished. How many Jewish Rothschilds are left in the world? G‑d knows we could have used them. Most of French Jewry today hails from North Africa. The originals are few and far between.

The American experience confirms beyond a shadow of a doubt that freedom, democracy and equal rights, while a wonderful blessing for Jews for which we should be eternally grateful, also present a profound challenge to our Jewish identity and way of life. In the melting pot of the United States, Jews have integrated so successfully that they are virtually disappearing! Success and affluence are wonderful gifts of opportunity, but we don't seem to be passing the test of faith with flying colors.

Is affluence a “kiss” or a “bite”? This is the test of the Jew today. May we never again face the dilemma of poverty or persecution. Please G‑d, we should be proud and knowledgeable Jews, successfully meeting the spiritual challenges of the good life.

(Excerpts from Chabad.org - by Rabbi Yossy Goldman)

May you have a meaningful and uplifting Shabbos!

Wednesday, November 25, 2015

Yarchei Kallah

There will be a Yarchei Kallah learning program this Thursday, November 26th, between 9:15am and 12:30pm, learning the sugya of Chanukah (Gemorah Shabbos 21b and Ma'amar להבין ענין נרות חנוכה תשכ"ו).

Tuesday, November 24, 2015

Yud Daled Kislev Farbrengen

There will be a farbrengen in honor of י"ד כסלו on Wednesday night, November 25th, at Tzemach Tzedek, after 8:30 Maariv.

Sunday, November 22, 2015

The Place - Speaker Event by Dena Estrin

Yud Kislev Farbrengen

There will be a farbrengen in honor of חג הגאולה - י' כסלו on Sunday night, November 22nd, at Tzemach Tzedek, after 8:30 Maariv.

Davening Times for the week of Parshas Vayishlach for Tzemach Tzedek

Shacharis - Sunday                                                                                  8:00, 9:00am

Shacharis - Monday thru Friday                                                               7:00, 8:00am

Mincha - Sunday thru Thursday                                                                        4:20pm

Maariv - Sunday thru Thursday                                                       5:10, 8:30, 9:30pm

Friday, November 20, 2015

Avos U'bonim this Motzoei Shabbos at 6:30 pm

Reminder to all Elementary school boys - Avos U’bonim this Motzoei Shabbos at 6:30 pm.

Come with your father or older brothers and spend valuable time learning together!

Followed by exciting raffles - great prizes, stories and treats!

Remember - boys seen learning nicely will receive raffle tickets for our bi-weekly grand prize! Also - special raffle for boys coming within the first 10 minutes (6:30-6:40 pm).

This week - raffle of remote-control Cadillac car!

Yasher Ko'ach to the Chaim Makarov family for sponsoring last week's Avos U’bonim in honor of son, Menachem Mendel's, Bar Mitzvah and to Rabbi Nachman Bronstein and Family for sponsoring the delicious treats last week!

Yasher Koach to Chona Larkin and family for sponsoring this week’s Avos U’bonim in honor of son's Sender wedding this week!!

Anyone who wants to have this special z'chus and sponsor the evening of Avos U’bonim, should please contact Rabbi Yisroel Shusterman – at either 845 356 1213 x 104 or 917 282 3505.

Parshas Vayetzei Schedule for Tzemach Tzedek

The following is the Tzemach Tzedek schedule for Shabbos Parshas Vayetzei:

Friday - ערב ש"ק

Licht Bentchen                                                                                             4:15pm

Minchah                                                                                                        4:31pm

Kabbolas Shabbos                                                                         approx. 5:05pm

Kiddush not after 5:41/6:00 and not before 6:41/7:00pm

שבת קודש

Rov's Shiur Chassidus                                                                                  8:45am

Sof Zman Krias Shma                                                                                  9:16am

Shacharis                                                                                                        9:30am

Farbrengen in honor of ט' כסלו following davening

Minchah Gedolah                                                                                       12:06pm
  
Rov's Halochoh Shiur                                                                                   3:45pm

Minchah                                                                                                         4:15pm

Motzoei Shabbos/Maariv                                                                            5:18pm

Avos U'bonim                                                                                                6:30pm 
!א גוטען שבת

הַקְהֵל אֶת־הָעָם הָאֲנָשִׁים וְהַנָּשִׁים וְהַטַּף ... לְמַעַן יִשְׁמְעוּ וּלְמַעַן יִלְמְדוּ וְיָרְאוּ אֶת־ה' אֱלֹקֵיכֶם

Thursday, November 19, 2015

Parsha Perspective

By Rabbi Yisroel Shusterman

This week’s Parsha Perspective is dedicated by Mr. Binyomin Philipson
in memory of his late mother Mrs. Ellen (Elka bas Zisel) Philipson OBM

In this week’s Torah portion of Vayeitzei (Bereishis 28:10-32:3), we read the story of Jacob's dream and the famous ladder with its feet on the ground and head in the heavens. "And behold the angels of G-d were ascending and descending on it."

Let me ask you what they might call in Yiddish, a klotz kashe (simplistic question). Do angels need a ladder? Everyone knows angels have wings, not feet. So, if you have wings, why would you need a ladder?

There is a beautiful message here.

In climbing heavenward one does not necessarily need wings. Dispense with the dramatic. There is a ladder, a spiritual route clearly mapped out for us; a route that needs to be traversed step-by-step, one rung at a time. The pathway to Heaven is gradual, methodical and eminently manageable.

Many people are discouraged from even beginning a spiritual journey because they think it needs that huge leap of faith. They cannot see themselves reaching a degree of religious commitment which to them seems otherworldly. And yet, with the gradual step-by-step approach, one finds that the journey can be embarked upon and that the destination aspired to is actually not in outer space.

A fellow walks into a rabbi’s office, saying, "Rabbi, I want to become 'frum' (fully observant), - now tell me what I must do?” - Now, isn’t that a rabbi’s dream come true for a congregant? Never!

Why not? Because a commitment like that is often here today and gone tomorrow. Like the popular saying, "Easy come, easy go." The correct and most successful method of achieving our Jewish objectives is the slow and steady approach. Gradual, yet consistent. As soon as one has become comfortable with one mitzvah, it is time to start on the next, and so on and so forth.

A teacher once asked the following question: "If two people are on a ladder, one at the top and one on the bottom, who is higher?" The class thought it was a pretty dumb question -- until the wise teacher explained that they were not really capable of judging who was higher or lower until they first ascertained in which direction each was headed.

If the fellow on top was going down, but the guy on the bottom was going up, then conceptually, the one on the bottom was actually higher.

And so my friends, it doesn't really matter what your starting point is or where you are at on the ladder of religious life. As long as you are moving in the right direction, as long as you are going up, you will, please G-d, succeed in climbing the heavenly heights.

(Excerpts from Chabad.org - from Rabbi Yossy Goldman)

May you have a meaningful and uplifting Shabbos!

Monday, November 16, 2015

Siyum HaRambam

There will be a Siyum HaRambam on Tuesday night, November 17th, at Tzemach Tzedek, after 8:30 Maariv.

Sunday, November 15, 2015

Save The Date - MBCM Hakhel Gala Banquet

Celebration 10 is underway!

Monsey Beis Chaya Mushka is celebrating its 10th year.

Save The Date - Join together for a Hakhel Gala Banquet with World Renowned Orator  Rabbi Yitzchok Schochet.


January 24th 2016 - 14 Shevat, 5776.

Save the Date - Women's Hakhel Evening


Davening Times for the week of Parshas Vayetzei for Tzemach Tzedek

Shacharis - Sunday                                                                       8:00, 9:00, 10:00am

Shacharis - Monday thru Friday                                                               7:00, 8:00am

Mincha - Sunday thru Thursday                                                                        4:25pm

Maariv - Sunday thru Thursday                                                       5:15, 8:30, 9:30pm

Friday, November 13, 2015

Parshas Toldos Schedule for Tzemach Tzedek

The following is the Tzemach Tzedek schedule for Shabbos Parshas Toldos:

Friday - ערב ש"ק

Licht Bentchen                                                                                             4:21pm

Minchah                                                                                                        4:37pm

Kabbolas Shabbos                                                                         approx. 5:05pm


Kiddush not before 6:40/7:00pm

שבת קודש

Rov's Shiur Chassidus                                                                                  8:45am

Sof Zman Krias Shma                                                                                  9:11am

Shacharis                                                                                                        9:30am

Minchah Gedolah                                                                                       12:05pm
  
Rov's Halochoh Shiur                                                                                   3:45pm

Minchah                                                                                                         4:20pm

Motzoei Shabbos/Maariv                                                                            5:22pm

Avos U'bonim                                                                                                6:30pm 
!א גוטען שבת

הַקְהֵל אֶת־הָעָם הָאֲנָשִׁים וְהַנָּשִׁים וְהַטַּף ... לְמַעַן יִשְׁמְעוּ וּלְמַעַן יִלְמְדוּ וְיָרְאוּ אֶת־ה' אֱלֹקֵיכֶם

Parsha Perspective

By Rabbi Yisroel Shusterman

This week’s Parsha Perspective is dedicated by Mr. Binyomin Philipson 
in memory of his late mother Mrs. Ellen (Elka bas Zisel) Philipson OBM

Our Torah portion this week Toldot (Bereishis 25:19-28:9) tells of the birth of the twins, Esau and Jacob, to Isaac and Rebecca. 

Jacob was once cooking soup, and his older brother, Esau, wanted a bowlful. Jacob offered the soup in exchange for Esau’s firstborn rights. Esau didn’t hesitate; he happily surrendered his birthright for a bowl of soup.

Years later, their father, Isaac, wanted to bless Esau. Jacob donned Esau’s garments and presented himself to his blind father as Esau. Jacob received the blessings, and Esau was incensed. “He deceived me twice,” cried Esau. “First he took my firstborn rights, and now he took my blessings!”

This story presents a question: Esau was understandably perturbed over losing the blessing. But why was he suddenly concerned over his birthright? He had surrendered it with barely protest years earlier, so what changed now?

When faced with an internal challenge, be it obsession, depression, addiction or a craving for food, the first step must be nurturing faith in our ability to overcome the challenge. So long as the hurdle seems insurmountable, the path to recovery is blocked. The journey to recovery can commence only if we possess a firm belief in our ability to succeed.

The journey can begin, but there is a long way to go. The road is strewn with obstacles, and overcoming them requires motivation, commitment and a great investment of energy. Knowing that we are capable of completing the journey does not guarantee that we will do so. It is only when we have succeeded in ridding ourselves of negative traits that we are truly liberated.

We are still not completely free; we are still at risk of succumbing to our weaknesses again. But we have gained real confidence. And we now know that, even if we should fail again, there will always be hope. We have overcome once and, if necessary, can do it again. This awareness stimulates confidence and joy, the ecstatic thrill of success.

The soul faces a similar challenge. It is given a task by G‑d to descend from heaven and function on earth. In a realm focused on materialism, pleasure, ego and self-worship, the soul is asked to introduce selflessness, devotion to a higher cause, and sanctity. A staggering task, but the soul contains the tools to succeed.

Jacob, the pious scholar, represents the soul. Esau, the wicked hunter, represents the body. Esau appeared a formidable foe; at first glance one would doubt that Jacob could ever prevail. The showdown transpired over a bowl of soup. Jacob allowed Esau the soup, but forced him to surrender his claim to the firstborn rights. This was Jacob’s way of saying that they might grapple, but from now on he would always have the strength to emerge triumphant - he is now the firstborn.

Now Esau realized that the birthright wasn’t merely a hypothetical tool. Esau conceded the point. He was not overly bothered by the soul’s untapped ability to triumph over the body, because he knew that tapping into this potential is difficult. In fact, most people never tap into it; they accept the formidability of their foe, and surrender long before the struggle begins. Thus, Esau rested secure in the knowledge that the soul’s vast potential will, most often, be left untapped.

Then disaster struck. Jacob challenged Esau and won; he actually received the blessing. The blessing represents the empowerment of the soul. It is Jacob’s spiritual delight, his soulful realization that he has bested Esau. It is the euphoric realization that comes with having conquered our will at least once. 

Now Esau was perturbed - about the blessing and the birthright. Now he realized that the birthright wasn’t merely a hypothetical tool never to be used; Jacob had used it once, and intended to use it again. With this dawning realization, Esau belatedly protested the sale of the birthright.

The good news for you and me is that Esau’s protests went unheeded. Neither the blessing nor the birthright was taken from Jacob. We are thus truly empowered to overcome the wiles and temptations, the cravings and yearnings, of our temporal and materialistic selves, and rise to the sacred worship of G‑d.

 (Excerpts from Chabad.org – by Rabbi Lazer Gurkow)

May you have a meaningful and uplifting Shabbos! 

Thursday, November 12, 2015

Mazel Tov Wolowiks!

With gratitude to Hashem we invite you to the kiddush in honor of the birth of our daughter, Shaina Bracha, this Shabbos, Parshas Toldos at Beis Menachem. 360 Rt. 306. Shacharis at 9:30.

Please consider this a personal invitation.

May we continue to share in each other's simchas.

Rabbi Avrohom and Baily Wolowik

Avos U'bonim this Motzoei Shabbos at 6:30 pm

Reminder to all Elementary school boys - Avos U'bonim this Motzoei Shabbos at 6:30 pm.

Come with your father or older brothers and spend valuable time learning together!

Followed by exciting raffles -  great prizes, stories and treats!

Remember - boys seen learning nicely will receive raffle tickets for our bi-weekly grand prize!

We are still looking for a sponsor for this week's Avos Ubonim program.

Yasher Ko'ach to the Zeilers and Hayman families for sponsoring the past two weeks' programs!! 

Apartment for Rent

Bright 2 or 3 Bedroom Apartment for Rent - Available January 1st 

* Minutes walk from Chabad Tzemach Tzedek

* Private entrance, big yard and quiet neighborhood. Half above - half below ground.

* Modern appliances, your own A/C and heating zones and washer/dryer.

* Non-smoking only, no pets.

Tuesday, November 10, 2015

Rosh Chodesh Kislev Farbrengen

There will be a grand farbrengen in honor of ראש חודש כסלו on Thursday night, November 12th, at Tzemach Tzedek, after 8:30 Maariv.

Saturday, November 7, 2015

Davening Times for the week of Parshas Toldos for Tzemach Tzedek

Shacharis - Sunday                                                                       8:00, 9:00, 10:00am

Shacharis - Monday thru Wednesday                                                      7:00, 8:00am

Shacharis - Thursday & Friday (Rosh Chodesh)                                     6:45, 8:00am

Mincha - Sunday thru Thursday                                                                        4:30pm

Maariv - Sunday thru Thursday                                                       5:20, 8:30, 9:30pm

Friday, November 6, 2015

Parshas Chayei Sara Schedule for Tzemach Tzedek

The following is the Tzemach Tzedek schedule for Shabbos Mevarchim Parshas Chayei Sara:

Friday - ערב ש"ק

Licht Bentchen                                                                                             4:28pm

Minchah                                                                                                        4:44pm

Kabbolas Shabbos                                                                         approx. 5:15pm


Kiddush not before 6:40/7:00pm

שבת קודש

Tehillim - Shabbos Mevorchim                                                                  8:30am

Sof Zman Krias Shma                                                                                  9:06am

Shacharis                                                                                       approx. 10:00am

Kiddush/Farbrengen following Davening

Minchah Gedolah                                                                                       12:05pm
  
Rov's Halochoh Shiur                                                                                   3:45pm

Minchah                                                                                                         4:30pm

Motzoei Shabbos/Maariv                                                                            5:29pm

Avos U'bonim                                                                                                6:30pm 


א גוטען שבת!

הַקְהֵל אֶת־הָעָם הָאֲנָשִׁים וְהַנָּשִׁים וְהַטַּף ... לְמַעַן יִשְׁמְעוּ וּלְמַעַן יִלְמְדוּ וְיָרְאוּ אֶת־ה' אֱלֹקֵיכֶם

Thursday, November 5, 2015

Lessons in Sefer HaMa'amorim Available



Available by Yossi Touger at jbtouger@aol.com or 845 430 8342.

Parsha Perspective

By Rabbi Yisroel Shusterman

This week’s Parsha Perspective is dedicated in memory of 
Mrs Feige Klein OBM 
by her son Dr Yehuda Klein and family, Monsey NY.

Abraham was the ultimate workaholic. In his youth, he organized and gave mass lectures on monotheism all across Mesopotamia. He wrote 400 books on the subject. At the age of 75, he moved to the Promised Land and continued his life’s mission apace. He set up and managed hospitality inns all over the country, launched a war to free his nephew, fathered a son when he was 86, and circumcised himself at 99. Not one to shirk hard work, he defended the people of Sodom before G‑d at 99, and fathered another son at the age of 100. When he was 137, he undertook an arduous three-day journey through the mountains to bind his son Isaac, and when he returned, he found that his wife Sarah had passed away. He immediately purchased a plot for her burial and organized her funeral, as detailed in this week's Parshah Chaye Sarah (Bereishis  23:1-25:18).

When this was all said and done, you might imagine that Abraham would have opted to rest, but that was not to be. Shortly after the mourning period for Sarah, he launched an involved campaign to find a bride for Isaac. And here is the most amazing part: after arranging for his son to be married, Abraham remarried and had more children. Abraham was not ready to give up and retire. He had lots of hard work left in him, and rest would need to wait.

I doubt that we can match Abraham’s pace, but we can learn a lesson from it.

Do you work all year so you can take a vacation in the summer, or do you vacation in the summer to rejuvenate and go back to work? Do you work all day so you can rest in bed at night, or do you rest in bed at night so you can wake up and work in the morning?

Because we sink into bed at night with a true sigh of relief and wake up in the morning with a long groan of unhappiness, we erroneously think that we are happier at rest than at work. But that isn’t true. When we are fully engaged, overcoming challenges, dealing with crises and making progress, we are vibrant, alive and abuzz. When we are relaxed and at rest, we grow indolent and sluggish.

We enjoy the moment of transition from frenetic pace to rest, which is why we sigh with relief when we crawl into bed, settle into a vacation, or light Shabbat candles on Friday night. But overall, we are happiest when we are at work.

This is because G‑d didn’t create man to relax, but to be purposeful. When we are pursuing a goal and accomplishing a purpose, we feel in sync with our essence. Being at rest is not natural to us. While we enjoy the break for a little while, we soon yearn for a return to work. Because at work, we are in “giving mode”: we contribute to the universe, to society and to life. When we are at rest, we are in “receiving mode”: we receive from the universe and from life. We feel more fulfilled when we’re contributing than when we’re receiving because we are, at heart, purpose-driven. It is how G‑d made us.

Abraham surely rested from time to time, but he clearly required less rest than most. What we can learn from Abraham is that rest is overrated. The best condition in life is the exuberance of hard work. That is when we come alive. That is when we are most fully human. That is when we most reflect our Creator.

He made us for a purpose. Our task is to find that purpose and pursue it. If at times we must rest, it is to gather strength for more work. Our rest invigorates us for the challenges that lie ahead.

May we find the strength to complete our tasks, the creativity to overcome our challenges, and the wisdom to appreciate the vibrancy that such trials bring.

May you have a meaningful and uplifting Shabbos!