Friday, June 10, 2011

Forward March For The Rubashkins

By Yisroel Besser, Mishpacha Magazine

New York - Over the past few years, images of the Rubashkin family have been freeze-framed in our consciousness: The meat plant. The raid. The living room. The courtroom scenes. The rallies…These scenes have been seared on our collective memory. The Rubashkins, though, have chosen to move forward. They’ve relocated and recalculated, adjusting the rhythm and routine of daily life to meet new challenges

In my home, we have a handsome, vinyl-bound blue book of classic children’s tales, pilfered by my wife from her parents’ bookshelf. Hidden in this treasury of life lessons is the Aesop fable The Country Mouse and the City Mouse.

In the story, a haughty city mouse goes to visit a relative in the country, where the host mouse offers him a typical country meal. The proud city mouse scoffs at the simple offering and invites the host back to the big city to sample some of life’s finer things. But the meal isn’t meant to be: the mice’s taste of high society is interrupted by a pack of dogs.

New York - Over the past few years, images of the Rubashkin family have been freeze-framed in our consciousness: The meat plant. The raid. The living room. The courtroom scenes. The rallies…These scenes have been seared on our collective memory. The Rubashkins, though, have chosen to move forward. They’ve relocated and recalculated, adjusting the rhythm and routine of daily life to meet new challenges

In my home, we have a handsome, vinyl-bound blue book of classic children’s tales, pilfered by my wife from her parents’ bookshelf. Hidden in this treasury of life lessons is the Aesop fable The Country Mouse and the City Mouse.

In the story, a haughty city mouse goes to visit a relative in the country, where the host mouse offers him a typical country meal. The proud city mouse scoffs at the simple offering and invites the host back to the big city to sample some of life’s finer things. But the meal isn’t meant to be: the mice’s taste of high society is interrupted by a pack of dogs.

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