Sunday, September 25, 2016

Davening Times for the week of Parshas Nitzavim for Tzemach Tzedek

Selichos - Monday thru Friday                                                      6:30, 7:30am

Shacharis - Sunday                                                           8:00, 9:00, 10:00am

Shacharis - Monday thru Friday                                                   7:00, 8:00am

Mincha - Sunday thru Thursday                                                            6:30pm

Maariv - Sunday thru Thursday                                           7:20, 8:30, 9:30pm

Friday, September 23, 2016

Rabbi Markowitz Esrogim Sale

As in previous years, Rabbi Zalmen Leib Markowitz will have Esrogim available at reduced prices.

Esrogim can be picked up at his home 24 Briarcliff Drive (downstairs entrance),

·   Wednesday, October 5, (3rd of Tishrei) - 7:30 to 10:30pm
·   Thursday, October 6, (4th of Tishrei) - 7:30 to 10:30pm
·   Motzoei Shabbos Shuva - 1 hour after Zman to Midnight
·   Sunday, October 9, (7th of Tishrei) - 12:00noon to 10:30pm
·   Monday, October 10, (8th of Tishrei) - 7:30 to 10:30pm
·   Thursday, October 13, (11th of Tishrei) - 7:30 to 10:30pm

For any other times, please call 914-906-6878 for an appointment.

Parshas Ki Savo Schedule for Tzemach Tzedek

The following is the Tzemach Tzedek schedule for Shabbos Slichos Parshas Ki Savo:

Friday - ערב ש"ק

Licht Bentchen                                                                                        6:32pm

Minchah Erev Shabbos                                                                          6:48pm

Kabbolas Shabbos                                                                                  7:20pm

שבת קודש

Chassidus Shiur                                                                                      9:00am

Sof Zman Krias Shma                                                                            9:47am

Shacharis                                                                                               10:00am

Halachah Shiur                                                                                        5:50pm

Minchah                                                                                                  6:35pm

Motzoei Shabbos/Maariv                                                                        7:30pm

Pre-Selichos Farbrengen                                                                       12:00am

Selichos                                                                                                   1:00am        

א גוטען שבת

הַקְהֵל אֶת־הָעָם הָאֲנָשִׁים וְהַנָּשִׁים וְהַטַּף ... לְמַעַן יִשְׁמְעוּ וּלְמַעַן יִלְמְדוּ וְיָרְאוּ אֶת־ה' אֱלֹקֵיכֶם

Parsha Perspective

By Rabbi Yisroel Shusterman

This week’s Parsha Perspective is dedicated by Mr. Binyomin Philipson in memory of his late mother Mrs. Ellen (Elka bas Zisel) Philipson OBM

Dear Friend,  

We are now in the Hebrew month of Elul, just a few days away from Rosh Hashanah and the High Holidays – a time of reflection, introspection and taking on new resolutions with which to enhance our lives, spiritually and meaningfully.

Cheder Chabad of Monsey hopes that these weekly Torah thoughts will help inspire to achieve those goals. All the students, staff and administration of Cheder Chabad of Monsey wish you and yours
a happy, healthy and prosperous New Year.

May this year be the year of the full and complete redemption with the coming of our righteous Moshiach - NOW!

In this week’s portion Ki Sovo (Devorim [Deuteronomy] 26:1-29:8), we read about Bikkurim (26:1-11), the first fruit offerings that Jewish farmers in the Holy Land were commanded to bring, in thanksgiving to G-d for the land and its produce. On a basic level, Bikkurim remind us never to become ungrateful for the things we are blessed with in life.

Interestingly, the law only took effect fourteen years after the Jewish people entered the Promised Land. It took seven years to conquer and another seven to apportion the land amongst the twelve tribes of Israel. Only when that process was completed did the law of the first fruits become applicable.

But why? Surely there were quite a few tribes who were settled earlier. No doubt, some of the farmers who had received their allotted land had planted and seen the first fruits of their labor. Why then were they not required to show their appreciation immediately by bringing the Bikkurim offering?

The Rebbe in a talk explains that in commanding this mitzvah the Torah uses the phrase, "And you shall rejoice with all the good that the L-rd your G-d has given you." In order to be able to fully experience the joy of his own blessings in life, a Jew needs to know that his brothers and sisters have been blessed as well. As long as one Jew knew that there were others who had not yet been settled in their land, he could not be fully content. Since simchah, genuine joy, was a necessary component in the mitzvah of Bikkurim, it could only be fulfilled when everyone had been satisfied. Only then can a Jew experience true simchah, a sincere and genuine joy. One Jew's satisfaction is not complete when he knows that his brother has not yet been taken care of.

So, if you have a job, think of someone who doesn't and try to do something to ease his plight. If you are happily married, think of those still searching for their bashert and try making a suitable introduction. And as the holiday season is almost upon us, if you will be privileged enough to be able buy new outfits for your family, spare a thought for those who cannot contemplate such a luxury. And when you plan your festive holiday meals with your family and friends, remember to invite the lonely, the widow and the single parent, too.

Rabbi Chesed Halberstam would often help out in the home of the Lubavitcher Rebbe. He relates that he was once present when the Rebbe came home for dinner, and noticed that before sitting down to eat, the Rebbe walked over to a charity box stationed near the dining room table and placed a few coins inside.

He eventually came to realize that this was a nightly routine of the Rebbe. Before tending to his own needs, the Rebbe participated in providing for the needs of another. What a beautiful custom.

In this merit, please G-d, we will all be blessed with a joyous and sweet new year.

(Excerpts from Chabad.org - by Rabbi Yossy Goldman)

May you have a meaningful and uplifting Shabbos!!

Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Chai Elul Farbrengen

There will be a farbrengen in honor of ח"י אלול on Wednesday night, September 21st, at Tzemach Tzedek shul, after the 8:30pm Maariv.

Sunday, September 18, 2016

Bus Tickets for Sale

For sale: Booklet of 38 Manhattan Monsey Trails Bus tickets, valid now through October 31st. 

$265 or best offer. Contact Doniyel Goldfarb at: 845-558-4614

Mazel Tov Bronsteins!

Mazel Tov to Rabbi and Mrs. Nachman Bronstein upon the birth of a granddaughter to Schneur Zalman and Faige Rabin of Montreal, Canada.

Tes-Vov Elul Farbrengen

There will be a farbrengen in honor of ט"ו אלול on Sunday night, September 18th, at Tzemach Tzedek shul, after the 8:30pm Maariv.

Davening Times for the week of Parshas Ki Savo for Tzemach Tzedek

Shacharis - Sunday                                                         8:00, 9:00, 10:00am

Shacharis - Monday thru Friday                                                 7:00, 8:00am

Mincha - Sunday thru Thursday                                                          6:40pm

Maariv - Sunday thru Thursday                                         7:30, 8:30, 9:30pm

Friday, September 16, 2016

Parshas Ki Seitzei Schedule for Tzemach Tzedek

The following is the Tzemach Tzedek schedule for Shabbos Parshas Ki Seitzei:

Friday - ערב ש"ק

Licht Bentchen                                                                                        6:44pm

Minchah Erev Shabbos                                                                          7:00pm

Kabbolas Shabbos                                                                                  7:30pm

שבת קודש

Chassidus Shiur                                                                                      9:00am

Sof Zman Krias Shma                                                                            9:44am

Shacharis                                                                                               10:00am

Minchah Gedolah                                                                                    1:21pm

Minchah                                                                                                  6:45pm

Motzoei Shabbos/Maariv                                                                        7:43pm

א גוטען שבת

הַקְהֵל אֶת־הָעָם הָאֲנָשִׁים וְהַנָּשִׁים וְהַטַּף ... לְמַעַן יִשְׁמְעוּ וּלְמַעַן יִלְמְדוּ וְיָרְאוּ אֶת־ה' אֱלֹקֵיכֶם

Parsha Perspective

By Rabbi Yisroel Shusterman

This week’s Parsha Perspective is dedicated by Mr. Binyomin Philipson in memory of his late mother Mrs. Ellen (Elka bas Zisel) Philipson OBM

Dear Friend,                                                                                                                                                                                    
We are now in the Hebrew month of Elul, just a few weeks away from Rosh Hashanah and the High Holidays – a time of reflection, introspection and taking on new resolutions with which to enhance our lives, spiritually and meaningfully. 

Cheder Chabad of Monsey hopes that these weekly Torah thoughts will help inspire to achieve those goals. All the students, staff and administration of Cheder Chabad of Monsey wish you and yours a happy, healthy and prosperous New Year. May this year be the year of the full and complete redemption with the coming of our righteous Moshiach - NOW! 

There is a rather curious juxtaposition of ideas in our Parshah this week, Ki Seitzei (Devorim [Deuteronomy] 21:10-25:19). The Torah cautions us against allowing Ammonite and Moabite men to convert and join the Jewish people. The reasons? Firstly, “because they did not greet you with bread and water on the road when you were leaving Egypt”. And secondly, “because they hired Balaam . . . to curse you.”

Such a diverse set of crimes lumped together. In the same breath we are told to shun them because they didn’t play the good hosts when we were a tired and hungry nation trudging through the desert from Egypt, and because they hired the heathen prophet Balaam to destroy us. How can we possibly compare these two reasons? The first is simply a lack of hospitality, while the second is nothing short of attempted genocide!

The answer is that the two are indeed interrelated.  If it was only a matter of not showing us any generosity during our journey, we could possibly justify it by their own poverty. Perhaps Ammon and Moab were in an economic depression. Maybe they were broke, and therefore were not in a position to offer hospitality. If they didn’t have enough for themselves, how can we expect them to have fed others?

But when we see that they hired Balaam the prophet to curse the Jewish people, then we know that money was not the problem. Do you think Balaam came cheap? “A houseful of gold and silver” was his asking price. If you found money for him, you could have found a few shekels to give some bread and water to tired, hungry travelers. The fact that they were prepared to pay such exorbitant fees to Balaam proves the enormity of their crime.

Ammon and Moab may be extinct, but their legacy lives on.

Sadly, we have a problem in our own community too. How often is a Jew approached for a worthy cause, and he pleads poverty, but the very next day he blows a fortune at a casino? We are too busy to come to a lecture or Shiur at Shul, but to kill a night watching a sports game — we have plenty of time.

Like the story of the fellow who asked the rabbi if he really needed to put up mezuzahs on all his doorways inside his house. When answered that he did, he gave a huge krechtz. “Oh Rabbi, but I just built a new house with eighteen rooms. Do you realize how much the mezuzahs are going to cost?!”

We are now in the month of Elul, a time for introspection, coming right before Rosh Hashanah, our Judgment Day. Let us reflect on how we spend our money and our time, and let us try our best to be consistent and honorable to G‑d and our fellow men and women.

(Excerpts from Chabad.org - from Rabbi Yossy Goldman)

May you have a meaningful and uplifting Shabbos!

Monday, September 12, 2016

Exciting Shlichus Opportunity for Post Seminary Girl

We are looking to hire a post seminary girl to be involved in our youth programs and homeschool in beautiful Boise, Idaho.

Some activities include: hebrew school,  Bat Mitzvah club and Yom Tov programs.

Fantastic experience! Please call 208 841 9927.

Looking to hire right away or after Yom Tov.

Bunk Beds for Sale

Sturdy real wood bunk beds for sale, mattresses included. Asking $400, needs a new home as soon as possible.

Call or text 845-270-8288. Leave message if no answer.

Sunday, September 11, 2016

Davening Times for the week of Parshas Ki Seitzei for Tzemach Tzedek

Shacharis - Sunday                                                         8:00, 9:00, 10:00am

Shacharis - Monday thru Friday                                       7:00, 8:00, 9:00am

Mincha - Sunday thru Thursday                                                          6:55pm

Maariv - Sunday thru Thursday                                       7:45,  8:30, 9:30pm

Friday, September 9, 2016

Parshas Shoftim Schedule for Tzemach Tzedek

The following is the Tzemach Tzedek schedule for Shabbos Parshas Shoftim:

Friday - ערב ש"ק

Licht Bentchen                                                                                        6:56pm

Minchah Erev Shabbos                                                                           7:12pm

Kabbolas Shabbos                                                                                  7:45pm

שבת קודש

Rov's Chassidus Shiur                                                                            9:00am

Sof Zman Krias Shma                                                                           9:42am

Shacharis                                                                                               10:00am

Minchah Gedolah                                                                                 1:24pm

Women's Pirkei Avos Shiur                                                                      5:00pm

Rov's Halochoh Shiur                                                                              6:10pm

Minchah                                                                                                   6:55pm

Motzoei Shabbos/Maariv                                                                     7:55pm

א גוטען שבת

הַקְהֵל אֶת־הָעָם הָאֲנָשִׁים וְהַנָּשִׁים וְהַטַּף ... לְמַעַן יִשְׁמְעוּ וּלְמַעַן יִלְמְדוּ וְיָרְאוּ אֶת־ה' אֱלֹקֵיכֶם

Parsha Perspective

By Rabbi Yisroel Shusterman

This week’s Parsha Perspective is dedicated by Mr. Binyomin Philipson in memory of his late mother Mrs. Ellen (Elka

We are now in the Hebrew month of Elul, just a few weeks away from Rosh Hashanah and the High Holidays – a time of reflection, introspection and taking on new resolutions with which to enhance our lives, spiritually and meaningfully.

Cheder Chabad of Monsey hopes that these weekly Torah thoughts will help inspire to achieve those goals. All the students, staff and administration of Cheder Chabad of Monsey wish you and yours a happy, healthy and prosperous New Year. May this year be the year of the full and complete redemption with the coming of our righteous Moshiach - NOW!

Don’t be judgmental. Unless, of course, you happen to be a judge. Then it’s your job.

This week’s Torah portion, Shoftim (Devorim [Deuteronomy] 16:18-21:9), is always read on the first Shabbat of the month of Elul. As nothing is accidental, this Torah portion must contain important lessons for us to implement during this auspicious month.

The Parshah begins with the biblical command for judges to be appointed in every city and town to adjudicate and maintain a just, ordered, civil society. Interestingly, it occurs in the first week of Elul, the month in which we are to prepare in earnest for the Days of Judgment ahead, Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur.

There are, however, some significant differences between earthly judges of flesh and blood and the heavenly judge. In the earthly court, if after a fair trial a defendant is found guilty, then there’s really not much room for clemency on the part of the judge. The law is the law and must take its course. The accused may shed rivers of tears, but no human judge can be certain if his remorse is genuine. After all, a human judge may only make a decision based on “what the eye can see.” The misdeed was seen to have been committed. The remorse, who knows? Perhaps he’s a good actor and is only acting contrite. The Supreme Judge on High, however, does know whether the accused genuinely regrets his actions or is merely putting on an act. Therefore, He alone is able to forgive. That is why in heavenly judgments, teshuvah (repentance) is effective.

The Maharal of Prague gave another reason. Only G‑d is able to judge the whole person. Every one of us has good and bad to some extent. Even those who have sinned may have many other good deeds that outweigh the bad ones. Perhaps even one good deed was of such major significance that it alone could serve as a weighty counterbalance. The point is, only G‑d knows. Only He can judge the individual in the context of his whole life and all his deeds, good and bad.

Our goal is to emulate the heavenly court. We should try to look at the totality of the person. You think he is bad, but is he all bad? Does he have no redeeming virtues? Surely, he must have some good in him as well. Look at the whole person.

A teacher once conducted an experiment. He held up a white plate and showed it to the class. In the center of the plate was a small black spot. He then asked the class to describe what they saw. One student said he saw a black spot. Another said it must be a target for shooting practice. A third suggested that the plate was dirty or damaged. Whereupon the teacher asked, “Doesn’t anyone see a white plate?”

There may have been a small black spot, but essentially it was a white plate. Why do we only see the dirt? Let us learn to find the good in others. Nobody is perfect, not even ourselves. Let’s not be so judgmental and critical. Let’s try to see the good in others.

(Excerpts from Chabad.org - from Rabbi Yossy Goldman)

May you have a meaningful and uplifting Shabbos!

Wednesday, September 7, 2016

Abel Bris

Michoel and Aliza Abel will be making the Bris for their newborn son on Thursday morning, September 8th, at Kehillas Beis Yehuda, 23 Lime Kiln Road, Wesley Hills, NY 10901.

Shacharis will be at 7:20, the bris at 8:00.

Sunday, September 4, 2016

Davening Times for the week of Parshas Shoftim for Tzemach Tzedek

Shacharis - Sunday                                                         8:00, 9:00, 10:00am

Shacharis - Monday thru Friday                                       7:00, 8:00, 9:00am

Mincha - Sunday thru Thursday                                                7:00pm ONLY

Maariv - Sunday thru Thursday                                       7:55,  8:30, 9:30pm

Friday, September 2, 2016

Parshas Re'eh Schedule for Tzemach Tzedek

The following is the Tzemach Tzedek schedule for Shabbos Parshas Re'eh:

Friday - ערב ש"ק

Licht Bentchen                                                                                        7:08pm

Minchah Erev Shabbos                                                                           7:24pm

Kabbolas Shabbos                                                                                  7:55pm

שבת קודש

Rov's Chassidus Shiur                                                                            9:00am

Sof Zman Krias Shma                                                                           9:39am

Shacharis                                                                                               10:00am

Minchah Gedolah                                                                                 1:28pm

Women's Pirkei Avos Shiur                                                                      5:30pm

Rov's Halachah Shiur                                                                              6:30pm

Minchah                                                                                                   7:10pm

Motzoei Shabbos/Maariv                                                                     8:07pm

א גוטען שבת

הַקְהֵל אֶת־הָעָם הָאֲנָשִׁים וְהַנָּשִׁים וְהַטַּף ... לְמַעַן יִשְׁמְעוּ וּלְמַעַן יִלְמְדוּ וְיָרְאוּ אֶת־ה' אֱלֹקֵיכֶם

Parsha Perspective

By Rabbi Yisroel Shusterman

This week’s Parsha Perspective is dedicated by Mr. Binyomin Philipson in memory of his late mother Mrs. Ellen (Elka bas Zisel) Philipson OBM

Ever heard a little kid bargaining with G-d? "G-d, if I pass this test/don't get into trouble, I'll brush my teeth every night…/walk around the block sixteen times without stepping on a crack…/..."

Ridiculous? Small-minded? Immature? Well, are our desires any more mature, our deals any more intelligent? So you promised to stay in shul for the entire service/read a Jewish book/say something nice to your mother-in-law. Are you any more likely to be guaranteed a positive answer to your hopes and aspirations?

There is one "bribe" however that G-d doesn't refuse: charity.

We'll read in the Torah this week, Re'eh (Devorim [Deuteronomy] 11:26-16:17), that we have the responsibility and privilege to support the poor. It is traditional to increase our charitable donations especially at this time of year (the month of Elul, which PG starts this week and which is the lead-in month before the High Holidays of Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur). However, isn't this just a particularly blatant attempt to bribe G-d? Does it really work? Why tzedakah (charity) more than any other mitzvah?

A wealthy Jew had been a long time financial supporter of the famous Chasidic master, Rebbe Zushe of Annippoli. He used to provide the Rebbe's household running expenses and was content to receive regular blessings and advice in return. Once he showed up in Reb Zushe's hometown, only to find Reb Zushe's wife home alone.

"Where is the Rebbe?"

"He's gone to visit his Rebbe."

"My Rebbe has a Rebbe?"

The rich man was no fool. "If my Rebbe has a Rebbe, why am I wasting time with the disciple? I've been doing so well by receiving the blessings of Reb Zushe, imagine the jackpot that awaits me were I to transfer my support to his Rebbe..."

He abandoned Reb Zushe and became a follower of Rabbi DovBer of Mezritch, Reb Zushe's Rebbe.

A few months later, after a series of calamitous business failures, he was back in Annipoli, totally bankrupt.

"I accept that my business failure is punishment for deserting you," he cried to Reb Zushe, "but why? What was wrong with my logic?"

"There was nothing wrong with your logic per se," Reb Zushe answered, "just in the application. Till now, when you gave tzedakah without assessing the worthiness of the recipient, G-d responded in kind, looking after you, irrespective of whether you truly deserved it. Once you started cost-benefit analyzing where you could get the best value for the money, G-d had a good look at how deserving you are, and you obviously came up short."

This is why it is traditional to increase in charitable giving at this time of the year and that is why we always read this parshah the week Elul begins. We're committing to change, to improve. We pray that G-d accepts us favorably, but who among us can be truly comfortable with the year that was? Ill decisions made, promises broken and wrong forks taken on the road of life. Our only hope is that G-d takes us back, warts and all, without examining too closely whether we deserve it. And, to set an example to G-d, we too hand out help with an open hand to all, (and perhaps a bit more than usual!) and with the hope that, please G-d, this year will be blessed with good health and prosperity and we will all receive the greatest gift of all: the final redemption, with our righteous Moshiach.

(Excerpts from Chabad.org - by Rabbi Elisha Greenbaum)

May you have a meaningful and uplifting Shabbos!

Thursday, September 1, 2016

Avraham Chaim Feldman - Minyanim

I am very sad to inform the olam of the unfortunate and unexpected petira of my dear grandson, Avraham Chaim ben Menachem Mendel Feldman.   The olam is requested to please help with the minyanim at my home, 29 North Rigaud Road, Spring Valley, N.Y.

Mincha:  Thursday, and Sunday through Tuesday at 7:15 pm. Friday at 3:00pm

Maariv: Thursday, and Sunday through Tuesday at 8:00pm. Motzoei Shabbos at 8:11pm

Shacharis: Friday and Sunday through Wednesday at 8:00am

Yosef Shandling

Monday, August 29, 2016

Seeking Ride

Couple looking for a ride to Crown Heights after 3pm tomorrow. Please call Cipi at 917-750-0918.

Sunday, August 28, 2016

Job Opportunity

We are looking to hire teachers for a new, Reggio-inspired preschool.

Please send resumes and references to office@mylittlegan.com

Mazel Tov Liberows!

Mazel Tov to Rabbi Moshe and Rochie Liberow on the birth of a baby girl (born on shabbos).

Saturday, August 27, 2016

Davening Times for the week of Parshas Re'eh for Tzemach Tzedek

Shacharis - Sunday                                                         8:00, 9:00, 10:00am

Shacharis - Monday thru Friday                                       7:00, 8:00, 9:00am

Mincha - Sunday thru Thursday                                                7:00, 7:15pm

Maariv - Sunday thru Thursday                                                 8:05, 9:30pm

Friday, August 26, 2016

Schild Shabbos Kallah


Parshas Ekev Schedule for Tzemach Tzedek

The following is the Tzemach Tzedek schedule for Shabbos Mevorchim Parshas Ekev:

Friday - ערב ש"ק

Licht Bentchen                                                                                        7:19pm

Minchah Erev Shabbos                                                                           7:35pm

Kabbolas Shabbos                                                                                  8:10pm

שבת קודש

Tehillim Shabbos Mevorchim                                                              8:30am

Sof Zman Krias Shma                                                                           9:37am

Shacharis                                                                                               10:00am

Kiddush/Farbrengen following Davening

Minchah Gedolah                                                                                 1:31pm

Women's Pirkei Avos Shiur                                                                      5:30pm

Rov's Halachah Shiur                                                                              6:35pm

Minchah                                                                                                   7:20pm

Motzoei Shabbos/Maariv                                                                     8:19pm

א גוטען שבת

הַקְהֵל אֶת־הָעָם הָאֲנָשִׁים וְהַנָּשִׁים וְהַטַּף ... לְמַעַן יִשְׁמְעוּ וּלְמַעַן יִלְמְדוּ וְיָרְאוּ אֶת־ה' אֱלֹקֵיכֶם

Parsha Perspective

By Rabbi Yisroel Shusterman

This week’s Parsha Perspective is dedicated by Mr. Binyomin Philipson in memory of his late mother Mrs. Ellen (Elka bas Zisel) Philipson OBM

“Man does not live by bread alone” (Devarim (Deuteronomy) 8:3) - a famous line, but what does it mean?

The verse comes from this week’s Torah portion Eikev (Devarim (Deuteronomy) 7:12-11:25), and is a reference to the miraculous Manna, which fell from heaven daily during the Jewish people’s sojourn in the wilderness. The conclusion of the verse states “rather, by the utterance of G‑d’s mouth does man live.” Thus, it is reminding us about the true source of human sustenance.

Contrary to popular belief, it is neither our earthly toil, nor the sweat of our brow, nor all those conferences, meetings and sales seminars that ensure our success. The reality is that it is G‑d who sustains us and looks after us, just as our ancestors trekking through the desert were totally dependent on Him for their daily bread. Wealth is a G‑dly gift. At the end of the day, it is not our business acumen alone that provides our daily bread, but the blessings from Above which endow our efforts with success.

Ask anyone in sales how often their best-laid plans and pitches have come to naught, and then, out of the blue, a big order comes in with little or no effort. Of course, it’s not the rule, and we must be prepared to put in effort if we are to succeed. But when it does happen, it reminds us that there are higher forces, beyond our control, at work.

But there’s another meaning to this verse as well. Man does not live by bread alone. The human spirit is such that we crave more than bread. Human beings are never satisfied with money or materialism alone.

Money is important, but we cannot live by money exclusively. What about job satisfaction? I know a number of individuals in our community who willingly gave up lucrative positions for less rewarding ones, because they found their work unstimulating. They were making lots of cash, but there was no emotional reward.

There are many people who have it all financially, but who are nonetheless unhappy people. They are very successful—and very miserable. For satisfaction to be lasting it must be more than material; it must be spiritual. We need to know that our lives have purpose, and that somehow we have made a difference. We want to be assured that our work is productive and will have lasting value.

We have a deep-seated need to know that our life’s work is purposeful, physically and spiritually. When we understand that every good deed is attached to a complex spiritual apparatus and what we do affects the cosmos - then our lives become endowed with a deeper sense of meaning and purpose.

We desperately need to know, as well, that in some way our work is helping others - that we are making a contribution to society beyond our own selfish needs. Then - we live. Then - we are happy.

Man does not live by bread alone. We simply cannot.

(Excerpts from Chabad.org - by Rabbi Yossy Goldman)

May you have a meaningful and uplifting Shabbos!

Tuesday, August 23, 2016

Chof Av Farbrengen

There will be a farbrengen in honor of כ' אב on Wednesday night, August 24th, at Tzemach Tzedek shul, after the 8:20pm Maariv.

Mazel Tov Fishers!

Mazel Tov to Rabbi Levi and Brany Fisher on the birth of a baby boy.

Sunday, August 21, 2016

Davening Times for the week of Parshas Ekev for Tzemach Tzedek

Shacharis - Sunday                                                         8:00, 9:00, 10:00am

Shacharis - Monday thru Friday                                       7:00, 8:00, 9:00am

Mincha - Sunday thru Thursday                                                7:00, 7:30pm

Maariv - Sunday thru Thursday                                                 8:20, 9:30pm

Friday, August 19, 2016

Parshas Vaeschanan Schedule for Tzemach Tzedek

The following is the Tzemach Tzedek schedule for Shabbos Parshas Vaeschanan:

Friday - ערב ש"ק

Licht Bentchen                                                                                        7:30pm

Minchah Erev Shabbos                                                                           7:46pm

Kabbolas Shabbos                                                                                  8:15pm

שבת קודש

Rov's Chassidus Shiur                                                                            9:00am

Sof Zman Krias Shma                                                                           9:35am

Shacharis                                                                                               10:00am

Minchah Gedolah.                                                                                1:33pm

Women's Pirkei Avos Shiur                                                                      5:30pm

Rov's Halachah Shiur                                                                              6:45pm

Minchah                                                                                                   7:30pm

Motzoei Shabbos/Maariv                                                                         8:31pm

א גוטען שבת

הַקְהֵל אֶת־הָעָם הָאֲנָשִׁים וְהַנָּשִׁים וְהַטַּף ... לְמַעַן יִשְׁמְעוּ וּלְמַעַן יִלְמְדוּ וְיָרְאוּ אֶת־ה' אֱלֹקֵיכֶם

Parsha Perspective

By Rabbi Yisroel Shusterman

This week’s Parsha Perspective is dedicated by Mr. Binyomin Philipson in memory of his late mother Mrs. Ellen (Elka bas Zisel) Philipson OBM

Nine-year-old Joey was asked by his mother what he had learned at Hebrew Sunday school.

"Well, Mom, our teacher told us how G‑d sent Moses behind enemy lines on a rescue mission to lead the Israelites out of Egypt. When he got to the Red Sea, he had his engineers build a pontoon bridge and all the people walked across safely. Then he used his walkie-talkie to radio headquarters for reinforcements. They sent bombers to blow up the bridge and all the Israelites were saved."

"Now, Joey, is that really what your teacher taught you?"

"Well, no, Mom. But if I told it the way the teacher did, you'd never believe it!"

One of the sacred tasks of parents and teachers is to educate the next generation and to impart to our children the knowledge and values of our Torah. We cannot be content with our own study – we have to teach the young.

This mitzvah is featured in this week's Torah portion Va’eschanan (Devarim (Deuteronomy) 3:23-7:11) in the words of the Shema which we recite thrice daily: “…teach them to your children, to discuss them, while you sit in your home, while you walk on the way, when you retire and when you arise…”

What is intriguing is that the great codifier Maimonides, as well as R. Schneur Zalman of Liadi, in his Code of Jewish Law, present the laws relating to teaching Torah to our children before presenting the laws of studying Torah. It seems quite obvious that one cannot teach before studying. Why would the laws pertaining to teaching a child precede the adult’s requirement to learn? Particularly considering that the power and advantage of a developed, adult, mature mind is enhanced and magnified by the wealth of life’s experiences and challenges of one’s past, which can be shared with the younger generation.

But there is a deficiency and handicap in an adult’s approach to absorbing the words of Torah. So often, objectivity and humility are casualties of preconceived ideas. Our life’s experiences have formed calluses on our attitudes and philosophies. We begin to judge by our decisions rather than decide by our judgments.

How often are we left unmoved by a truth because we are self-consciously aware of the ramifications of accepting such truths? We fit teachings into lifestyles rather than confront the challenge of change.

The laws of studying Torah are preceded by the laws of teaching a child, to remind us how to absorb the words of G-d. The learning of a young child – so eager, so fresh and so unencumbered by life’s baggage – is like “ink written on fresh paper,” – teaching us the art of true Torah study.

May our spiritual and intellectual journeys always retain the effervescence, passion and innocence of a child. May we, this Shabbat Nachamu, ("Shabbat of Comfort" following the period of mourning of Tisha b’Av),  find comfort, optimism and belief in a world about to be redeemed, by allowing ourselves to peer through the eyes and hope of a child.

(Excerpts from  Chabad.org  - by Rabbi Dovid Hazdan)

May  you have a meaningful and uplifting Shabbos!