Sunday, February 19, 2017

Davening Times for the week of Parshas Mishpotim for Tzemach Tzedek

Shacharis - Sunday                                                                 8:00, 9:00, 10:00am

Shacharis - Monday thru Friday                                                6:48, 7:00, 8:00am

Mincha - Sunday thru Thursday                                                                  5:25pm

Maariv - Sunday, thru Thursday                                                6:10, 8:30, 9:30pm

Friday, February 17, 2017

Parshas Yisro Schedule for Tzemach Tzedek

The following is the Tzemach Tzedek schedule for Shabbos Parshas Yisro - Chof Beis Shevat:

Friday - ערב ש"ק


Licht Bentchen                                                                                       5:15pm

Minchah Erev Shabbos                                                                          5:31pm

Kabbolas Shabbos                                                                                 6:00pm

No Kiddush between 6:10/6:00pm - 7:10/7:00pm

שבת קודש

Rov's Chassidus Shiur                                                                           8:45am

Sof Zman Krias Shma                                                                            9:28am

Shacharis                                                                                               9:30am


Kiddush/Farbrengen following Davening

Minchah Gedolah                                                                                 12:37pm

Rov's Halochoh Shiur                                                                             4:30pm

Minchah                                                                                                  5:15pm

Motzoei Shabbos/Maariv                                                                        6:17pm  

Avos U'bonim                                                                                        7:15pm

א גוטען שבת

Thursday, February 16, 2017

Parsha Perspective

By Rabbi Yisroel Shusterman

This week’s Parsha Perspective is dedicated by Mr. Binyomin Philipson in memory of his late mother Mrs. Ellen (Elka bas Zisel) Philipson OBM

Dedicated in memory of Leah bas Rochel OBM

This week’s Torah reading, Yitro (Shmos [Exodus] 18:1–20:23), records the momentous event of the Jewish people camping at Mount Sinai and receiving the Torah.

In the Dayenu hymn in the Passover Haggadah, we list all the wonders that G‑d did for us when we left Egypt. After each of the fifteen stanzas of this hymn we say, "dayenu" - "it would have sufficed us.", as the hymn begins "If He had brought us out from Egypt, and had not carried out judgments against them - dayenu, (it would have sufficed us!" ) etc.

One of the stanzas reads: "If He had brought us to Mount Sinai, but not given us theTorah - dayenu!" Now this seems puzzling. What in the world would be the point of going to Mount Sinai if not to receive the Torah? What other point is there in being there? After all, at this particular mountain there is neither food, water nor skiing.

But actually, something very special happened at Sinai even before G‑d appeared to the Jewish people. The Torah tells us that "Vayichan sham Yisrael neged hahar," "Israel camped there opposite the mountain." The biblical commentator Rashi points out that the word the Torah uses,  וַיִחַן (vayichan), is in the singular tense - "He camped" rather than "they camped." This, Rashi explains, denotes that the entire nation encamped there as one man with one heart.
indeed then, this Dayenu phrase ells us that if all that was accomplished with the Jews arriving at Mount Sinai was the Jewish people standing united for one moment - this itself is an accomplishment of amazing worth. Coming together as one and putting aside all our differences for a greater purpose is one of the greatest mitzvot we can do. It stands on its own, and was a moment of closeness to G‑d that carried intense significance, even if the Torah had not been given.

The lesson for us today is obvious. If we but  restrain ourselves from any action, comment or even a thought that may cause dissension and instead do, say, or  think something which would promote harmony amongst our people, then we have paralleled that greatest moment in Jewish history and all that it accomplished, the revelation of G-d at Sinai.

(Excerpts from Chabad.org - from Rabbi Shlomo Yaffe)

May you have a meaningful and uplifting Shabbos!!

If you would like to dedicate the weekly Parsha Perspective in honor or memory of a person or occasion, please contact Rabbi Shusterman at yshusterman@chedermonsey.org

Monday, February 13, 2017

Shiva

Mrs. Shoshana Udelson, Mrs.  Chani Goodfriend, and Mrs. Devorah Drew will sitting shiva for Yosef Udelson at 10 Ashlawn Ave, Spring Valley.

Shiva will end Sunday morning.  People are requested not to come before 10 AM, between 4-7PM and not after 9 PM.

Dinka Kumer will be sitting at her house in Tzfas Israel and can be reached at + 972503040770

Saturday, February 11, 2017

Davening Times for the week of Parshas Yisro for Tzemach Tzedek

Shacharis - Sunday                                                                 8:00, 9:00, 10:00am

Shacharis - Monday thru Friday                                                6:48, 7:00, 8:00am

Mincha - Sunday thru Thursday                                                                  5:15pm

Maariv - Sunday, thru Thursday                                                6:05, 8:30, 9:30pm

Friday, February 10, 2017

Parshas Beshalach Schedule for Tzemach Tzedek

The following is the Tzemach Tzedek schedule for Shabbos Shirah Parshas Beshalach - Tu B'Shvat:

Friday - ערב ש"ק


Licht Bentchen                                                                                       5:06pm

Minchah Erev Shabbos                                                                          5:22pm

Kabbolas Shabbos                                                                                 5:55pm

No Kiddush between 6:11/6:00pm - 7:11/7:00pm

שבת קודש

Rov's Chassidus Shiur                                                                           8:45am

Sof Zman Krias Shma                                                                            9:33am

Shacharis                                                                                               9:30am


Kiddush/Farbrengen following Davening

Minchah Gedolah                                                                                 12:37pm

Rov's Halochoh Shiur                                                                             4:20pm

Minchah                                                                                                  5:05pm

Motzoei Shabbos/Maariv                                                                        6:09pm  

Avos U'bonim                                                                                        7:15pm

א גוטען שבת

Thursday, February 9, 2017

Parsha Perspective

By Rabbi Yisroel Shusterman

This week’s Parsha Perspective is dedicated by Mr. Binyomin Philipson in memory of his late mother Mrs. Ellen (Elka bas Zisel) Philipson OBM

Dedicated in memory of Leah bas Rochel OBM

The story is told of the cantor who was approached after the synagogue services by an indignant member of the congregation.

"That was the most awful rendition I ever heard in my life!"

The president of the synagogue turned to the cantor to console him: "Oh don't worry about him, he just repeats what everyone else says!"

This week's Torah reading speaks of the song which Moses and the Israelites sang after the redemption from Egypt and the miraculous splitting of the sea: The verse states that "Then Moses and the children of Israel sang this song to G‑d..."

Like everything Jewish, there are several opinions about how the song was sung:

The Talmud tells us that according to Rabbi Akiva, Moses said the first few words of the verse, "For He has triumphed gloriously" and everybody responded, "I will sing to G‑d". They continued to respond with this refrain "I will sing to G‑d" after each verse that Moses sang.

According to Rabbi Eliezer, however, Moses sang "I will sing to G‑d," and everybody responded, repeating "I will sing to G‑d". They continued, with the entire congregation repeating each verse after their leader.

Rabbi Nechemiah’s opinion is that Moses began by singing the opening words of the song, following which each person sang the rest of the song on their own.

These three opinions represent three different degrees of leadership and ability to inspire.

Rabbi Akiva is showing us a scenario where the people are totally given over to their leader. He alone sings the song of gratitude to G‑d, with the people simply affirming everything that he is expressing.

Although it may appear to be the ultimate unity, with everybody united behind one cause, Rabbi Eliezer takes this is unity even further. According to him, they did not merely affirm what Moses was singing by repeating the same refrain, but they actually repeated the words themselves. It was more personalized. Each individual was able to internalize the words, thus becoming a reflection of that person's own deep feelings and comprehension. The very same words, expressed by hundreds of thousands of different people, were able to take on many different nuances, depending on the individual person.

Rabbi Nechemiah takes leadership to the ultimate level. If it is really coming from their own deepest, essential being, why should they need to repeat it after somebody? According to Rabbi Nechemiah's view, Moses merely started them off with a few words of the song, thereby inspiring them to reach deep within and experience the miracle, with the result that each of them sang the entire song on their own.

True leadership is about empowering others to tune in, to be in harmony with the leader and the ideals being expressed and lived, thereby becoming leaders in their own right.

This past Monday (February 6, 2017) in the Jewish calendar, was 10 Shvat, marking the 67th anniversary of the passing of the Rabbi Yosef Yitzchok Schneerson, the previous Lubavitcher Rebbe OBM (in 1950) and the ascent to leadership of Rabbi Menachem M Schneerson, OBM (in 1951). To quote former Chief Rabbi of the UK, Rabbi Jonathan Sacks, after having had audience with the Rebbe, “The world was wrong. When they thought that the most important fact about the Rebbe was that here was a man with thousands of followers, they missed the most important fact: That a good leader creates followers, but a great leader creates leaders”!

The Rebbe was indeed a great leader!

(Excerpts from Chabad.org - by Rabbi Mordechai Wollenberg)

Tu B'Shvat

This Shabbat in the Jewish calendar is the 15th day of the Hebrew month Shvat. This day, known as Tu b’Shvat (15th of Shvat), the Jewish Arbor day, also has its own beautiful customs and traditions. To learn more about this special day, click here.

May you have a meaningful and uplifting Shabbos!!

Monday, February 6, 2017

Listen to Rabbi Seligson's יו"ד שבט Farbrengen here: (Audio)

A large crowd of men and women turned out for a beautiful יו"ד שבט seudah and farbrengen with special guest the Mashpia Reb Michoel Seligson. After Maariv Reb Yosef Shandling - as has been doing for many years, chazzered the first two אותיות of the מאמר באתי לגני. After a few opening words from the מרא דאתרא Harav Lesches, Rabbi Seligson captivated the large crowd for hours with both a history of the days leading up to and following the first Yud Shvat, as well as many interesting stories about the Rebbe's devotion to Chassidim and the lessons we can take from them in our everyday lives.

The organizers would like to thank the sponsors of the event. The farbrengen would not have been possible with the tireless devotion and hard work of several people who wish to remain anonymous, as well as the Board of Directors and the גבאים.

Click Here for full audio







Yud Shevat Farbrengen with Rabbi YY Jacobson

Monday evening, Rabbi YY Jacobson will hold a grand Yud Shevat Farbrengen, for men, women and children.

Time: Monday, Yud Shevat, Feb. 6, 7:30 PM

Location: 20 Forshay Road, Monsey, NY.

Music by Ben Shimon.

Hot food will be served. All are welcome. Special section for women.

You can watch the event live on www.theyeshiva.net

Seeking Visitors

A lonely elderly Jewish woman from the Catskills moved to Fountain View assisted living.

She would most definitely appreciate a visitor once in a while. If anyone would like to volunteer, please contact me at 845-842-8082 or email me at Rabbi@jewishcatskills.org

Rabbi Simcha Zajac
Chabad of Rock Hill

Saturday, February 4, 2017

Yud Shevat Community Farbrengen

Please join us for what is sure to be an inspiring evening dedicated to strengthening our התקשרות to our Rebbe. Rabbi Michoel Seligson, son of Dr. Avrohom Seligson ע"ה, and a descendant of the Alter Rebbe, is a noted Mashpia and teacher of Chassidus and the author of a number of works, including the popular מפתח ענינים לשיחות קודש.  Maariv will be at 8:00. 


Davening Times for the week of Parshas Beshalach for Tzemach Tzedek

Shacharis - Sunday                                                                 8:00, 9:00, 10:00am

Shacharis - Monday thru Friday                                                6:48, 7:00, 8:00am

Mincha - Sunday thru Thursday                                                                  5:05pm

Maariv - Sunday                                                                                 5:55, 8:00pm

Maariv - Monday, thru Thursday                                                5:55, 8:30, 9:30pm

Friday, February 3, 2017

Parshas Bo Schedule for Tzemach Tzedek

The following is the Tzemach Tzedek schedule for Shabbos Parshas Bo:

Friday - ערב ש"ק

Licht Bentchen                                                                                       4:57pm

Minchah Erev Shabbos                                                                          5:13pm

Kabbolas Shabbos                                                                                 5:45pm

No Kiddush between 6:10/6:00pm - 7:10/7:00pm

שבת קודש

Early Minyanim for Krias HaTorah                                              approx. 8:15am

Sof Zman Krias Shma                                                                            9:37am

Shacharis                                                                                               9:30am

Kiddush/Farbrengen following Davening

Minchah Gedolah                                                                                 12:36pm

Rov's Halochoh Shiur                                                                             4:15pm

Minchah                                                                                                  5:00pm

Motzoei Shabbos/Maariv                                                                        6:00pm  

Avos U'bonim - special Melaveh Malka                                                  7:00pm

א גוטען שבת

Thursday, February 2, 2017

Additional Lainings before Shacharis this Shabbos























This being the Shabbos before Yud Shvat, there will be extra Lainings on Shabbos morning starting at approximately 8:15 AM.

The Aliyos will be given out on a first-come, first-served basis. Additional minyanim will happen during the regular Schachris laining as well.

Shacharis remains at 9:30am.

Annual Avos U'bonim Melave Malka

Attention all elementary boys and their fathers :

This Motzoei Shabbos, which is before Yud Shvat - is the Annual Avos U'Bonim Melave Malka to be held after the learning program in the Tzemach Tzedek Shul 2 Langeries Drive Monsey.

We thank Reb Refoel Huisman and family for sponsoring the program, in honor of their son Schneur's  birthday last week.

It will be a washing Melave Malka with stories of the Rebbe and the Frierdike Rebbe being told, in addition to the regular weekly raffles and prizes .

All elementary boys and their fathers are encouraged to attend!

Rabbi Yisroel Shusterman

Parsha Perspective

By Rabbi Yisroel Shusterman

This week’s Parsha Perspective is dedicated by Mr. Binyomin Philipson in memory of his late mother Mrs. Ellen (Elka bas Zisel) Philipson OBM

Dedicated in memory of Leah bas Rochel OBM

The words ring out again and again in the biblical account of the Exodus story, as Moses repeatedly demands of the unrelenting Pharaoh that he grant the Jewish people their freedom, in the Torah portion this week Bo (Shmos [Exodus] 10:1- 13:16).

Actually, the precise words that Moses conveys to the stubborn monarch in the name of G‑d are, “Shalach ami v’yaavduni,” “Let My people go so that they may serve Me.” (Exodus 10:3)

It is interesting to see how some expressions and phrases become memorable and popular, while others just don’t seem to catch on. “Let My People Go” became the theme song for the story of Egypt and the Exodus way beyond the Jewish community. It has been used as a catchphrase for a variety of political causes. Unfortunately, the last Hebrew word of the phrase somehow got lost in the shuffle: v’yaavduni - “that they may serve Me” - never quite made it to the top of the charts. The drama of the Exodus captures our imagination, while the fact that that the purpose of leaving Egypt was to go to Sinai, receive G‑d’s Torah and fulfill Jewish destiny is less emphasized. The call to freedom excites the human spirit; the challenge of service and commitment, by contrast, doesn’t seem to elicit as much enthusiasm.

One might remember back  in the early ’70s, when Jews the world over were demonstrating for their oppressed brethren in the then Soviet Union, demanding of the Russian government that they allow Jews the freedom to leave if they wanted to. Their rallying cry was, “Let My People Go!” Sadly, they left out the v’yaavduni. We were so concerned about political liberties that we forgot a primary purpose of being free: to enjoy religious freedom and live fulfilled Jewish lives.

Indeed, for so many of our Russian brethren, obtaining their exit visas and acquiring freedom of movement did little to help them reclaim their spiritual heritage and identity. Seventy years of organized atheism behind the Iron Curtain left their toll. We are delighted that they can live in Israel (or Brighton Beach), but the fact remains that far too many remain outside of the Jewish community and its spiritual orbit.

It is clear that political freedom minus spiritual purpose equals disillusionment. Leaving Egypt without the vision of Sinai would be getting all dressed up with nowhere to go. It is not enough to let our people go. We have to take them somewhere. “That they may serve Me” means that we need to use our political freedom to experience the freedom and fulfillment of faith.

This forthcoming Monday (February 6, 2017) in the Jewish calendar is 10 Shvat, marking the 67th anniversary of the passing of the Rabbi Yosef Yitzchok Schneerson, the previous Lubavitcher Rebbe OBM (in 1950) and the ascent to leadership of Rabbi Menachem M Schneerson, OBM. Throughout the years of their leadership, particularly here in America, this was a key theme – to teach and inspire all Jews  that true freedom must have with it  a life of spiritual purpose dedicated to G‑d’s service, in order to realize our destiny, achieve our goal and indeed be a “light unto the nations”.

(Excerpts from Chabad.org - by Rabbi Yossy Goldman)
 
May you have a meaningful and uplifting Shabbos!!

If you would like to dedicate the weekly Parsha Perspective in honor or memory of a person or occasion, please contact Rabbi Shusterman at yshusterman@chedermonsey.org

Saturday, January 28, 2017

Davening Times for the week of Parshas Bo for Tzemach Tzedek

Shacharis - Sunday                                                                 8:00, 9:00, 10:00am

Shacharis - Monday thru Friday                                                6:48, 7:00, 8:00am

Mincha - Sunday thru Thursday                                                                  5:00pm

Maariv - Sunday, thru Thursday                                                5:45, 8:30, 9:30pm

Friday, January 27, 2017

Parshas Va'eira Schedule for Tzemach Tzedek

The following is the Tzemach Tzedek schedule for Shabbos Rosh Chodesh Parshas Va'eira:

Friday - ערב ש"ק


Licht Bentchen                                                                                       4:49pm

Minchah Erev Shabbos                                                                          5:05pm

Kabbolas Shabbos                                                                                 5:35pm

No Kiddush between 6:09/6:00pm - 7:09/7:00pm

שבת קודש

Rov's Chassidus Shiur                                                                           8:45am

Sof Zman Krias Shma                                                                            9:40am

Shacharis                                                                                               9:30am

Kiddush/Farbrengen following Davening

Minchah Gedolah                                                                                 12:34pm

Rov's Halochoh Shiur                                                                             4:10pm

Minchah                                                                                                  4:50pm

Motzoei Shabbos/Maariv                                                                        5:52pm  

Avos U'bonim                                                                                          7:00pm

א גוטען שבת

Wolfson - Ringler Wedding


Thursday, January 26, 2017

Parsha Perspective

By Rabbi Yisroel Shusterman

This week’s Parsha Perspective is dedicated by Mr. Binyomin Philipson in memory of his late mother Mrs. Ellen (Elka bas Zisel) Philipson OBM

Dedicated in memory of Leah bas Rochel OBM

“Gratitude is an attitude,” some wise man surely must have said at some time. The Torah, in this week’s Parshah, demonstrates just how far Jewish tradition teaches us to be grateful and to remember our benefactors.

Seven of the ten plagues occur in the Torah portion this week of Va’aira (Shmos [Exodus] 6:2- 9:35). Moses, messenger of G‑d, is busy bringing down these terrifying plagues on Pharaoh’s Egypt. Yet, interestingly, he calls upon his brother Aaron to be the agent for the first three plagues - blood, frogs and lice. Why did Moses not do these himself, as he would do the others?

The Midrash, quoted by Rashi, teaches us that this is because it was through the agency of the waters of the Nile River that Moses was saved as an infant when he was put in the basket. It would have been insensitive and inappropriate for him to strike those very waters in order to bring on plagues. Seeing as the blood and the frogs both came directly from the water, it was Aaron who stuck the water rather than Moses. Similarly with the third plague, that of lice. The lice came from out of the ground, and the earth, too, had helped Moses to cover the body of the Egyptian taskmaster whom he had killed defending a Jewish slave. Therefore, it would have been wrong for Moses to strike the earth, and so for this plague, too, Aaron was the agent.

What a monumental lesson to each of us on the importance of gratitude. First: Do water and earth have feelings? Would they know the difference if they were struck, and who was doing the striking? How much more so should we be considerate of human beings when they have done us a kindness. How scrupulous we ought to be not to offend people, especially those who have come to our assistance.

Second: Moses was 80 years old at the time of the plagues. These incidents with the water and earth occurred when he was a mere infant and when he was a very young man. And yet, all these years later he is still sensitive not to strike the objects that had helped him. He did not say, as so many have after him, “So what have you done for me lately?”

The story is told of the Chatam Sofer (Rabbi Moshe Schreiber, 1762 - 1839) that he once did an enormous favor for someone. Later, the fellow asked him, “Rabbi, what can I ever do to repay you for your kindness?” The Chatam Sofer replied, “One day, when you get upset and angry with me, please remember what I have done for you today - and, rather than pelting me with big rocks, please throw small stones instead.” Sad, but oh so true. In a similar vein, an elder Jew once said of someone, “Why does he hate me so much? I never did him any favors!”

This little story of Moses teaches us to remember the kindnesses that are bestowed upon us - when they happen, and forever. If one who has been good to us in the past does wrong and needs chastising, let someone else volunteer for the job. He may need rebuking, but you’re not the one to do it.

Once again, the Torah is teaching us not only religious ritual, but how to be better people - more sensitive, and eternally grateful human beings.

(Excerpts from Chabad.org - by Rabbi Yossy Goldman)

May you have a meaningful and uplifting Shabbos!

If you would like to dedicate the weekly Parsha Perspective in honor or memory of a person or occasion, please contact Rabbi Shusterman at yshusterman@chedermonsey.org

Friday, January 20, 2017

Parsha Perspective

By Rabbi Yisroel Shusterman

This week’s Parsha Perspective is dedicated by Mr. Binyomin Philipson in memory of his late mother Mrs. Ellen (Elka bas Zisel) Philipson OBM

Dedicated in memory of Leah bas Rochel OBM

We never really know why things happen. Do we always deserve everything life throws at us, good or bad? Allow me to share a message from this week's Parshah which may shed a little light on the mysteries of life and our higher destinies.

In this week's Torah reading, we begin the second book of the Torah Shmos (Exodus1:1-6:1). This is the Parshah that describes the beginning of bondage for the Jewish people in Egypt. Moses experiences his first official Divine revelation at the Burning Bush. There he is charged with the formidable mission to confront the Pharaoh and demand that he "Let My people go." Moses is full of questions and repeatedly seeks G-d's reassurances.

It was not necessarily for what they had done in the past that G-d would redeem the Jewish people, but for what He anticipated for them in the future... In one exchange at the Bush, Moses asks, Who am I that I should go to Pharaoh and that I should take the Children of Israel out of Egypt? Rashi interprets the first part of the question as Moses doubting his own qualifications to suddenly become a player in the king's court. In his typical humble way Moses didn't see himself worthy of challenging the mighty monarch of Egypt. The second part of the verse is explained by Rashi to be questioning the worthiness of the Jewish People. What have they actually done to deserve such a miraculous redemption?

To which the Almighty answers, firstly, have no fear and have no doubts, I will be with you. And secondly, this is your sign that I have sent you: when you take the people out of Egypt, you will serve G-d on this mountain.

Now it's very nice to know that this mountain was, in fact, Mount Sinai and that the Burning Bush encounter occurred on that very same mountain. But wherein lies G-d's answer to Moses' second question? He asked "who am I?" so G-d replied to the point and said don't worry "I will be with you." But to the question of by what merit did Israel deserve redemption we don't see any answer. That they "will serve G-d on this mountain" doesn't seem relevant to the discussion at all.

Here it is that we find a fascinating insight into the intriguingly infinite ways of Providence. G-d was saying that it was not necessarily for what they had done in the past that he was ready to redeem the Jewish people, but for what He anticipated for them in the future. On this very mountain they would receive His Torah; they would become His chosen messengers to be a light unto the nations; they would be the moral standard bearers for the entire world. Never mind what they did or didn't do in the past. G-d had big plans for this nation and it would all begin with the impending Exodus.

What a powerful message for all of us. Sometimes, the kindness G-d does for us is not because of what we've been but rather what it would enable us to become. It's not for what we have already done but for what we still will do.

So should any of us be the beneficiaries of a special blessing from Above, instead of patting ourselves on the back and concluding that we must have done something wonderful to be thus rewarded, let us rather ask ourselves what G-d might be expecting us to do with this particular blessing in the future. How can we use it to further His work on earth? Special blessings carry with them special responsibilities.

May each of us successfully develop all the potential G-d sees in us and use it for our own moral development and to better the world around us.

(Excerpts from Chabad.org - by Rabbi Yossy Goldman)

May you have a meaningful and uplifting Shabbos!

If you would like to dedicate the weekly Parsha Perspective in honor or memory of a person or occasion, please contact Rabbi Shusterman at yshusterman@chedermonsey.org

Monsey Anash Directory

It's mid-year and people have been moving in and around the greater community.

Cheder Chabad of Monsey does not want to fall behind updating its database in anticipation of a third "Monsey Anash Directory"!

Anash who would like to send in an edit and add cell phone and email to their existing listing should contact directory@chedermonsey.org as well as new residents who can send in addresses, phone numbers etc.

Please share this communication with newcomers so they can meet everyone!

Wednesday, January 18, 2017

Chof Teves Farbrengen

There will be a farbrengen in honor of כ' טבת tonight, January 18th, at Tzemach Tzedek shul, after the 8:30pm Maariv.

Mazel Tov Cwibekers and Larkins!

Mazel Tov to Efraim and Sara Cwibeker on the birth of a baby boy last week. Mazel tov to the grandparents Reb Chona and Shulamis Larkin.

Sunday, January 15, 2017

Davening Times for the week of Parshas Shemos for Tzemach Tzedek

Shacharis - Sunday                                                                 8:00, 9:00, 10:00am

Shacharis - Monday thru Friday                                                6:48, 7:00, 8:00am

Mincha - Sunday thru Thursday                                                                  4:40pm

Maariv - Sunday, thru Thursday                                                5:30, 8:30, 9:30pm

Friday, January 13, 2017

Mazel Tov Kleins!

Mazel tov to Shmuel and Miriam Klein on the birth of a granddaughter, born to Yanky and Shandel Strasberg.

Parshas Vayechi Schedule for Tzemach Tzedek

The following is the Tzemach Tzedek schedule for Shabbos Chazak Parshas Vayechi:

Friday - ערב ש"ק

Licht Bentchen                                                                                       4:32pm

Minchah Erev Shabbos                                                                          4:48pm

Kabbolas Shabbos                                                                                 5:20pm

No Kiddush between 6:06/6:00pm - 7:06/7:00pm

שבת קודש

Rov's Chassidus Shiur                                                                           8:45am

Sof Zman Krias Shma                                                                            9:42am

Shacharis                                                                                               9:30am

Minchah Gedolah                                                                                 12:30pm

Rov's Halochoh Shiur                                                                             3:45pm

Minchah                                                                                                  4:30pm

Motzoei Shabbos/Maariv                                                                        5:37pm  

Avos U'bonim                                                                                          6:45pm

א גוטען שבת

Parsha Perspective

By Rabbi Yisroel Shusterman

This week’s Parsha Perspective is dedicated by Mr. Binyomin Philipson in memory of his late mother Mrs. Ellen (Elka bas Zisel) Philipson OBM

Dedicated in memory of Leah bas Rochel OBM

A title usually reflects the theme of the subject matter. "Genesis" is about the beginning of the world, "Exodus" is about the Jews leaving Egypt. Whether it is a book, film or lecture series, the title should convey some idea of the content it describes.

The title of this week's Parsha (Torah reading) Vayechei (Bersishis [Genesis] 47:28 - 50:26) seems highly inappropriate. Vayechi means "And He Lived." derived from the Parshah's opening line, "And Jacob lived in the land of Egypt seventeen years...”.The Parshah, however, goes on to tell us not about Jacob's life, but rather about his death: his last will and testament to his children, his passing, his funeral, and his interment in Hebron in the Holy Land.

Why would a parshah that concentrates on a person's last days on earth, his deathbed instructions and his burial be entitled "And He lived?"

The answer, say our sages, is that we are not discussing biological organisms, but Jews. And the test of true life for a Jew is whether he lived an authentic, consistent Jewish life - for life. Did he falter before the finish line, or was he faithful to his value system until the end?

How do we know that Jacob did indeed live, in the fullest sense of the word? That his was a genuine, G-dly life? When we see that he remains true to those ideals until his dying day. Only then can we say with certainty that his life was truly alive; that his was a Vayechi life. The fact that Jacob died a righteous man validated his entire life-span, establishing it as a true life, alive and real from beginning to end.

There are individuals who have their eight minutes of fame, who shine briefly and impress the world only to fade away and leave us disappointedly watching so much unfulfilled potential dissipate into thin air. Others are longer lasting, but don't quite go all the way.

Complacency is dangerous. There are no guarantees. One must constantly "live" - i.e., grow and attempt to improve oneself - lest one falter before the finish line.

It is psychologically sound to take up a hobby, learn to play golf or develop other interests outside of work. A Jew, though, should ideally start studying Torah, go to classes, read a stimulating book. Studying and sharpening the mind is good for the brain. Recent medical research confirms that it can even delay the onset of Alzheimer's. Most importantly, a person must have something to live for. Find new areas of stimulation. Discover, dream, aspire higher. Life must be lived with purpose and vigor.

That's why at the end of this week's Parsha, which also concludes the Book of Genesis, the congregation and Torah reader will proclaim Chazak, chazak v'nischazek - "Be strong, be strong, and we will all be strengthened." Because the tendency when we finish a book is to take a breather before we pick up the next one. Such is human nature. But a book of the Torah is not just any book. Torah is not just history or biography. Torah is our source of life, and we dare not ever take a breather from life.

"Chazak" energizes us to carry on immediately. And so we do. The very same afternoon we open the Book of Exodus and continue the learning cycle without interruption.

Truth is consistent, from beginning to end. May our lives be blessed to be truly alive - with authenticity, faithfulness and eternal fulfillment.  Amen.

(Excerpts from Chabad.org - by Rabbi Yossy Goldman)

May you have a meaningful and uplifting Shabbos!

If you would like to dedicate the weekly Parsha Perspective in honor or memory of a person or occasion, please contact Rabbi Shusterman at yshusterman@chedermonsey.org

Tuesday, January 10, 2017

MBCM Annual Dinner

Dear Member of Anash, 'שי

We are proud to invite you to participate in the annual dinner of MBCM, which will take place IY"H on Sunday January 22, כ"ד טבת, at the Valley Terrace Hall.

MBCM, as you know is our community girls high school, started over 10 years ago, with the vision of providing a local quality Chabad girls high school education for the growing Monsey community and its close neighbor, Morristown.

Today, this investment has certainly been validated. The growth and expansion of the Greater Monsey community is beyond all expectations. This year's student body numbers close to 90, with projected larger numbers with future incoming classes. 

This year's dinner, on the Yom Hilula of the Alter Rebbe, will celebrate our 11th year with a farbrengen led by Rabbi Naftali Silberberg and the Yossi Cohen Acapella focusing and learning from the inspiring nigunim of the Baal Hahilula.

At the Dinner we are proud to honor Dan & Miriam Pines and Aroni & Esty Chein.

What better time to enable our further growth, and show your support for community's high school?

By participating in our dinner or ad journal you are supporting an all-round successful, growing Mosad.

This dinner, our main fundraiser of the year, is a chance to do just that.

Please join us at the dinner; Put an ad in our journal in honor of our dear honorees, a special person, time or event; or the teachers and hanhala of MBCM. Encourage others to come.

All details can be found on our website - www.monseybcm.com/dinner .

A sincere thank you for all those who have already responded.

Looking forward to your participation,

Rabbi Chaim D. Kagan, Menahel




Monday, January 9, 2017

Davening Times for the week of Parshas Vayechi for Tzemach Tzedek

Shacharis - Monday thru Friday                                                6:48, 7:00, 8:00am

Mincha - Sunday thru Thursday                                                                  4:35pm

Maariv - Sunday, thru Thursday                                                5:25, 8:30, 9:30pm

Friday, January 6, 2017

Asarah B'Teves Schedule for Tzemach Tzedek

Alos Hashachar/Dawn (Beginning of Fast)                                                 5:49am

Shacharis                                                                                 8:00, 9:00, 10:00am

Mincha                                                                                                2:00, 4:25pm

Maariv and end of fast                                                                                 5:16pm

Parshas Vayigash Schedule for Tzemach Tzedek

The following is the Tzemach Tzedek schedule for Shabbos Parshas Vayigash:


Friday - ערב ש"ק

Licht Bentchen                                                                                       4:25pm

Minchah Erev Shabbos                                                                          4:40pm

Kabbolas Shabbos                                                                                 5:15pm


No Kiddush between 6:02/6:00pm - /7:00pm

שבת קודש

Rov's Chassidus Shiur                                                                           8:45am

Sof Zman Krias Shma                                                                            9:42am

Shacharis                                                                                               9:30am

Minchah Gedolah                                                                                 12:26pm

Rov's Halochoh Shiur                                                                             3:45pm

Minchah                                                                                                  4:25pm

Motzoei Shabbos/Maariv                                                                        5:30pm  

Avos U'bonim                                                                                          6:45pm


א גוטען שבת